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Globalisation of Komatsu: digging out of trouble

Author: Black, Stewart ; Khayat, NadineINSEAD Area: Organisational BehaviourPublisher: Fontainebleau : INSEAD, 2010.Language: EnglishDescription: 22 p.Type of document: INSEAD CaseNote: Latest version available via https://publishing.insead.eduAbstract: The 2008 recession hit the Japanese firm Komatsu especially hard. The world's second-largest manufacturer of construction and mining equipment saw its share price plummet by two thirds after the downturn. The drop (which was not the first) signalled deeper underlying issues that could be traced back to the company's development from domestic player, exporter, international player, to global player. The case looks to gain insights on why the early domestic and export phases succeeded, while the company subsequently struggled in its international and global expansion.Pedagogical Objectives: The case traces the history of Komatsu to gain insights such as: Why did growth strategies in different geographical locations succeed at times and fail at others? What were the implications of Komatsu's management policies as they responded to changing domestic and global market conditions? Was a lack of a diversified top leadership inhibiting the company's sustained growth in the global market, especially as it pushed even further into emerging markets in Asia, Latin America and the Middle East? How could they ensure that Komatsu was the exception rather than the rule to the pattern of early domestic and export success, followed by international stumbles and continued global struggles?
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Latest version available via <a href=https://publishing.insead.edu>https://publishing.insead.edu</a>

The 2008 recession hit the Japanese firm Komatsu especially hard. The world's second-largest manufacturer of construction and mining equipment saw its share price plummet by two thirds after the downturn. The drop (which was not the first) signalled deeper underlying issues that could be traced back to the company's development from domestic player, exporter, international player, to global player. The case looks to gain insights on why the early domestic and export phases succeeded, while the company subsequently struggled in its international and global expansion.

The case traces the history of Komatsu to gain insights such as: Why did growth strategies in different geographical locations succeed at times and fail at others? What were the implications of Komatsu's management policies as they responded to changing domestic and global market conditions? Was a lack of a diversified top leadership inhibiting the company's sustained growth in the global market, especially as it pushed even further into emerging markets in Asia, Latin America and the Middle East? How could they ensure that Komatsu was the exception rather than the rule to the pattern of early domestic and export success, followed by international stumbles and continued global struggles?

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