Normal view MARC view

Hollywood economics: how extreme uncertainty shapes the film industry

Author: De Vany, Arthur Series: Contemporary political economy series Publisher: Routledge 2004.Language: EnglishDescription: 308 p. : Graphs ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9780415312615Type of document: BookBibliography/Index: Includes bibliographical references and index
Tags: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Book Europe Campus
Main Collection
Print HC2000 .M6 D48 2004
(Browse shelf)
001257885
Available 001257885
Total holds: 0

Includes bibliographical references and index

Digitized

Hollywood Economics How Extreme Uncertainty Shapes the Film Industry Contents List of figures List of tables Acknowledgments Prologue PART I Box-office champions, chaotic dynamics and herding 1 The market for motion pictures: rank, revenue and survival 1.1 Introduction 11 1.2 The motion picture exhibition market 12 1.3 Evolutionary survival tournaments 14 1.4 The Variety data 15 1.5 The survival model 18 1.6 Empirical results 19 1.7 Conclusions 26 2 Bose­Einstein dynamics and adaptive contracting in the motion picture industry 2.1 1ntroduction 28 2.2 The mechanics of supply 29 2.3 Demand discovery and distribution! dynamics 32 2.4 Empirical box-office revenue distributions 37 2.5 Explaining the industry 44 2.6 Conclusions 46 3 Quality evaluations and the breakdown of statistical herding in the dynamics of box-office revenue 3.1 Introduction 48 3.2 Information and demand dynamics 49 3.3 The model 51 xi xiii xvi 1 7 11 28 48 3.4 Estimates 52 3.5 The stable Paretian modal 56 3.6 Bifurcation at phase transitions 57 3.7 Discussion of results 60 3.8 Conclusions 62 PART II "Wi1d" uncertainty, tough decisions and false beliefs 4 Uncertainty in the movie industry: can star power reduce the terror of the box office? 4.1 Introduction 71 4.2 Related literature 72 4.3 Modeling star power 73 4.4 The movie data 77 4.5 Estimation results 84 4.6 Choosing among movie projects 96 4.7 Conclusions 98 5 Does Hollywood make too many R-rated movies?: risk, stochastic dominance and the illusion of expectation 5.1 Introduction 99 5.2 Motion picture production by ratings 101 5.3 Choosing among uncertain movie projects 103 5.4 Ranking by success rates 108 5.5 Ranking by stochastic dominance 110 5.6 Conclusions 120 6 Big budgets, big openings and legs: analysis of the blockbuster strategy 6.1 Introduction 122 6.2 The blockbuster and the information cascade 123 6.3 Movie industry data and summary statistics 125 6.4 A structural modal of box-office outcomes 129 6.5 Conclusions 137 PART III Judges, lawyers and the movies 7 Motion picture antitrust: the Paramount cases revisited 7.1 The essential economics of motion pictures 145 7.2 The feature motion picture 151 65 71 99 122 139 143 73 Integration and licensing 154 7.4 The courts' analyses 166 7.5 Paramount's efects 170 7.6 Conclusions 174 8 Was the antitrust action that broke up the movie studios good for the movies?: evidence from the stock market 8.1 Introduction 176 8.2 The studio system 178 8.3 The Paramount litigation 178 8.4 Stock prices 181 8.5 The feasibility of a motion picture cartel 186 8.6 Winners and losers 188 8.7 Conclusions 189 9 Stochastic market structure: concentration measures and motion picture antitrust 9.1 Introduction 190 9.2 Market power: theory and policy 191 9.3 Concentration in United States v. Paramount Pictures 193 9.4 Instability of concentration and shares 194 9.5 Turnover of the leadingfirms 200 9.6 Standard models do not apply to motion pictures 202 9.7 The probability distribution of the HHI 204 9.8 Conclusions 206 PART IV A business of extremes 10 Motion picture profit, the stable Paretian hypothesis and the curse of the superstar 10.1 Introduction 211 10.2 The stable hypothesis 213 10.3 Motion picture profit 214 10.4 The stable distribution 216 10.5 Stable estimation and diagnostics 217 10.6 Probability under the stable model 219 10.7 «Nobody know? 220 10.8 Conditional stable analysis and superstars 221 10.9 Sample average and expected value 223 10.10 The curse of the superstar 225 10.11 Success breeds success 226 176 190 207 211 10.12 Cost momentum and the angel's nightmare 227 10.13 Stable distribution and contracting 228 10.14 Conclusions 230 11 Contracting with stars when "nobody knows anything" 11.1 Introduction 231 11.2 On becoming a superstar 232 11.3 Artists and kurtosis 235 11.4 Career expectations and opportunities 238 11.5 Luck or talent? 239 11.6 Competing for stars 243 11.7 Artist contracts 245 11.8 Pay when you do know 246 11.9 Director contracts 251 11.10 Conclusions 254 12 How extreme uncertainty shapes the movie business 12.1 Introduction 255 12.2 Complex systems 256 12.3 Universality 258 12.4 Deep order 259 12.5 Complexity and the stable Paretian distribution 265 Epilogue: can you manage a business when "nobody knows anything"? Probabilities 268 Inside and outside the studio 268 Risk and decision bias 269 Narrow framing and sure things 270 Financing movies 271 Causality and Kim Basinger 273 A skeptical attitude 275 Notes Bibliography Index 231 255 267 276 298 305

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.
Koha 18.11 - INSEAD Catalogue
Home | Contact Us | What's Koha?