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The global environment of business

Author: Guy, Frederick Publisher: Oxford University Press (OUP) 2009.Language: EnglishDescription: 332 p. : Graphs ; 25 cm.ISBN: 9780199206629 ; 9780191548567 (eBook)Type of document: Book Online Access: Click here Bibliography/Index: Includes bibliographical references and index
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Book (short loan) Asia Campus
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Print HD2755.5 .G89 2009
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Book (short loan) Asia Campus
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Print HD2755.5 .G89 2009
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900204497
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E-book HD2755.5 .G89 2009
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Includes bibliographical references and index

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The Global Environment of Business Contents LIST OF FIGURES LIST OF TABLES 1. Introduction PART I: CAUSES OF INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC INTEGRATION 2. Technological Change and International Production 2.1. Cars: From national to international markets 2.2. The global, the regional, the corporation, and the state 2.3. Theories of international production 2.4. Technological change and the internationalization of production 2.5. Summing up 3. Globalization? 3.1. What's happening? 3.2. Globalization in the long run 3.3. Globalization's retreats 3.4. More useful ways of talking about changes in international interdependence and connectedness today 4. Some Economic Concepts 4.1. Standard trade theory 4.2. Origins: Smith and Ricardo 4.3. Increasing returns 4.4. Increasing returns and the theory of international trade 5. The Politics of International Trade 5.1. When the US and Germany were NICs 5.2. The rise and decline of free trade 5.3. Cheap grain 6. Empire 6.1. Natural resources, transaction costs, and colonial control 6.2. Control without colonies 6.3. Explaining decolonization 6.4. The consequences of designing institutions for resource extraction 7 7 8 12 16 33 35 35 36 38 40 43 43 43 47 49 53 53 56 64 71 72 73 75 77 x xi 1 PART II: THE RISE OF BIG BUSINESS 7. Changing Technology, Changing Industry 7.1. Industrial revolutions 7.2. Socioeconomic paradigms 7.3. Long waves and hegemonic power 8. The Origins of the Modern Corporation in the Age of Steel 8.1. How big machines led to big companies 8.2. Why did big machines produce big companies? Three theories 8.3. Mass production of machines 9. Fordism, or the Golden Age of Mass Production 9.1. The triumph of mass production 9.2. Stabilizing mass production 9.3. The end of the Golden Age PART III: BUSINESS SYSTEMS TODAY 10. Two Forms of Post-Fordism 10.1. Japan and flexible mass production 10.2. Visions of a post-Fordist world 10.3. Explaining failures of transition: Production methods embedded in institutions 10.4. Actually existing American post-Fordism 11. Varieties of Capitalism 11.1. Institutional difference as a source of comparative advantage 11.2. Two varieties of capitalism? 11.3. Labor market institutions 11.4. Varieties of finance and corporate governance 11.5. Relationships between companies and systems of innovation 11.6. Political systems: Consensus and CMEs, majoritarianism and LMEs 11.7. Continuity and change in national business systems 12. Clusters 12.1. The industrial district narrative 12.2. What makes firms cluster? 12.3. The classic industrial district model versus actually existing clusters 12.4. Good jobs? 12.5. Conclusion 13. Newly Industrialized Countries 13.1. The Tigers: Overcoming the limits of ISI 13.2. The political economy of the developmental state 13.3. Varieties of Tiger: Differing institutions, production systems, and products 13.4. Later waves of new: NICs in the age of international production 133 133 136 139 142 153 153 154 155 164 169 170 171 177 178 183 188 197 198 199 200 209 215 218 81 81 87 90 93 94 96 107 113 113 114 125 14. Poverty Traps 14.1. Life and death 14.2. Life, death, and institutions 14.3. Institutions or policies? 14.4. Two obstacles to institutional change PART IV: PROSPECT 15. The Future: Regional Rivalries, Environmental Limits, and the Likely Retreat of the Global Corporation 15.1. Upgrading, diversification, and absorptive capacity 15.2. The economic and political logic of regions 15.3. Economic growth, global warming, and energy prices 15.4. Upgrading, regionalism, and high energy prices: Completing the picture NOTES REFERENCES INDEX 225 226 227 229 236 251 252 253 255 257 259 263 281

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