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The network challenge: strategy, profit, and risk in an interlinked world

Author: Kleindorfer, Paul R. ; Wind, Yoram ; Gunther, Robert E.INSEAD Area: Technology and Operations ManagementPublisher: Wharton School Publishing, 2009.Language: EnglishDescription: 559 p. : Graphs/Ill. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9780137011919Type of document: INSEAD BookBibliography/Index: Includes bibliographical references and indexAbstract: Today's global enterprises face a profound dilemma: They cannot compete without networks to access resources or markets. In fact, networks are proving to be an extraordinary source of value creation: one that is permanently transforming the very nature of the organization. However, these immensely powerful networks present equally large risks - as has been proven in events ranging from China's toxic milk scandal to the United States' toxic asset collapse. In this book, more than 50 of the world's most innovative business thinkers take on the #1 challenge faced by today's large organizations: the challenge of managing and leveraging networks. Renowned Wharton Business School innovators Jerry Wind and Paul Kleindorfer have brought together 28 new essays that identify the core challenges businesses face in a networked world; reveal the business implications of emerging information-based, social, and biological networks; and guide businesses in leveraging networks for innovation. Executives will find actionable insights for optimizing organizational structure, promoting internal and external coordination, mitigating risk, and -- above all -- increasing long-term profitability. They will find indispensable knowledge for managing everything from supply chains to social networks, leadership to strategy, IT to terrorism and infectious disease. This book won't just transform the way business leaders think about networks: it will transform the way they build, use, and profit from them.
Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
INSEAD Book Asia Campus
INSEAD Publications Display
Print HD30.28 .K54 2009
(Browse shelf)
900197946
Available 900197946
INSEAD Book Europe Campus
Main Collection
Print HD30.3 .K54 2009
(Browse shelf)
001251791
Available 001251791
INSEAD Book Europe Campus
Main Collection
Print HD30.3 .K54 2009
(Browse shelf)
001251807
Available 001251807
INSEAD Book Europe Campus
Main Collection
Print HD30.3 .K54 2009
(Browse shelf)
001252439
Available 001252439
INSEAD Book Middle East Campus
INSEAD Publications Display
Print HD30.3 .K54 2009
(Browse shelf)
500000258
Available 500000258
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Includes bibliographical references and index

Today's global enterprises face a profound dilemma: They cannot compete without networks to access resources or markets. In fact, networks are proving to be an extraordinary source of value creation: one that is permanently transforming the very nature of the organization. However, these immensely powerful networks present equally large risks - as has been proven in events ranging from China's toxic milk scandal to the United States' toxic asset collapse. In this book, more than 50 of the world's most innovative business thinkers take on the #1 challenge faced by today's large organizations: the challenge of managing and leveraging networks. Renowned Wharton Business School innovators Jerry Wind and Paul Kleindorfer have brought together 28 new essays that identify the core challenges businesses face in a networked world; reveal the business implications of emerging information-based, social, and biological networks; and guide businesses in leveraging networks for innovation. Executives will find actionable insights for optimizing organizational structure, promoting internal and external coordination, mitigating risk, and -- above all -- increasing long-term profitability. They will find indispensable knowledge for managing everything from supply chains to social networks, leadership to strategy, IT to terrorism and infectious disease. This book won't just transform the way business leaders think about networks: it will transform the way they build, use, and profit from them.

Digitized

The Network Challenge Strategy, Profit, and Risk in an Interlinked World Contents Authors ..................................................................................................xviii Foreword by Dean Thomas S. Robertson and Dean Frank Brown .................................................................................. xxv Preface ...................................................................................................xxvi PART I THE NETWORK CHALLENGE Chapter 1 The Network Imperative: Community or Contagion? ................................. 3 Paul Kleindorfer and Yoram (Jerry) Wind Abstract ...................................................................................................... 3 The Rise of Networks ................................................................................ 5 Challenging the Theory of the Firm ...........................................................8 The Network That Is This Book............................................................... 13 Meeting the Challenge of Networks ........................................................ 21 References ................................................................................................. 23 Chapter 2 Creating Experience: Competitive Advantage in the Age of Networks ..................................................................................... 25 CK Prahalad Abstract .................................................................................................... 25 An Innovation Continuum ....................................................................... 29 A Networked Model for Addressing Diabetes .........................................32 Impediments to Networked Innovation .................................................... 34 New Sources of Competitive Advantage ................................................. 34 References ................................................................................................ 36 Chapter 3 Knowledge as a Social Phenomenon: "Horse Holding" and Learning in Networks...................................................................... 37 Alan M. Kantrow Abstract .................................................................................................... 37 "That" Versus "Why"................................................................................ 38 Knowledge as a Social Phenomenon ....................................................... 40 Forgetting the "Why's" ........................................................................... 40 Dangers of Horse Holding ...................................................................... 45 Letting Go the Horses .............................................................................46 References .............................................................................................. 48 Chapter 4 Cross-Cultural Leadership in Networked Global Enterprises ................................................................................49 Russell E. Palmer Abstract ...................................................................................................49 Introduction ............................................................................................ 50 Leadership Across Cultures ....................................................................51 Culture and Leadership Styles: The Globe Project................................. 55 Building a Strong Organizational Culture: The Honeywell Way ...........59 Conclusions: Building Cross-Cultural Leadership .................................62 References .............................................................................................. 63 PART II FOUNDATIONS Chapter 5 Social Networks: You've Lost Control ......................................................67 Dawn Iacobucci and James M. Salter II Abstract ...................................................................................................67 The Discipline of Social Networks: Examining Interdependencies ................................................................................... 68 History of Thought in Social Networks ..................................................70 Concepts and Theories in Social Networks ............................................72 Key Substantive Findings: What Do We Know? ................................... 75 Implications for Marketing Management and Business ......................... 77 Conclusion: Losing Control ................................................................... 80 References ...............................................................................................80 Chapter 6 Biological Networks: Rainforests, Coral Reefs, and the Galapagos Islands ................................................................... 85 Sonia Kleindorfer and James G. Mitchell Abstract ...................................................................................................85 Biological Networks ............................................................................... 88 Network Structure: What Determines Food Web Stability? ..................89 Network Evolution ................................................................................. 91 Conclusions: Biology and Business ....................................................... 96 References............................................................................................... 99 Chapter 7 Information Networks in the History of Life ...........................................105 Robert Giegengack and Yvette Bordeaux Abstract ................................................................................................ 105 Senses and Network Communication ...................................................108 Communication in Colonial Structures ................................................ 111 Implications for Human Networks........................................................ 119 Conclusion ............................................................................................122 References ............................................................................................ 123 Chapter 8 Artificial Intelligence: How Individual Agents Add Up to a Network ......................................................................... 125 Steven O. Kimbrough Abstract ................................................................................................ 125 Cellular Automata Models: Localized Decisions Combine for Unexpected Effects ......................................................... 127 Agent-Based Models ............................................................................ 133 Evolutionary Models ............................................................................ 137 Conclusion: Lessons Leamed and Looking Forward ...........................139 References ............................................................................................ 141 PART III INNOVATION AND COORDINATION IN NETWORKS Chapter 9 Network-Centric Innovation: Four Strategies for Tapping the Global Brain ............................................................ 147 Satish Nambisan and Mohanbir Sawhney Abstract ................................................................................................ 147 Network-Centric Innovation ................................................................ 149 Models of Network-Centric Innovation ............................................... 151 Organizational Competencies and Capabilities for Network-Centric Innovation ................................................................ 158 Implications for Research and Practice ................................................161 Conclusion ............................................................................................162 References ............................................................................................ 163 Chapter 10 Coordination Networks in Product Development.................................. 165 Manuel E. Sosa Abstract ................................................................................................ 165 The Development Process as a Web of Design Activities ...................166 Complex Products as Networks of Components .................................. 171 The Informai Communication Network of Design Teams ................... 175 Conclusions and Future Directions .......................................................180 References .............................................................................................181 Chapter 11 Organizational Design: Balancing Search and Stability in Strategic Decision Making .............................................................. 185 Jan W. Rivkin and Nicolaj Siggelkow Abstract ................................................................................................. 185 A Model of Organizational Search and Organizational Design ........... 189 Schwab: The Benefit of Sequencing Organizational Structures ...........194 Toyota: Beyond a Modular Approach .................................................. 198 Conclusion: Organizing to Search for an Effective Strategy ................ 201 References .............................................................................................202 PART IV STRATEGY AND BUSINESS MODELS Chapter 12 Complexity Theory: Making Sense of Network Effects . . ....................207 Colin Crook Abstract ................................................................................................. 207 Key Concepts of Complexity Theory for Business .............................. 208 Key Implications for Managers ............................................................ 213 Key Unanswered Questions ..................................................................220 Becoming Confortable with Complexity...............................................221 References .............................................................................................222 Chapter 13 Supply Webs: Managing, Organizing, and Capitalizing on Global Networks of Suppliers .......................................................225 Serguei Netessine Abstract ................................................................................................. 225 Managing Supplier Relationships: The Automotive Industry .............. 228 Leveraging Coordinating Technology: The Aerospace and Defense Industry ................................................................................................. 231 Research on Managing Supplier Networks .......................................... 235 Conclusion ............................................................................................ 237 References .............................................................................................239 Chapter 14 Leveraging Customer Networks ............................................................243 Christophe Van den Bulte and Stefan Wuyts Abstract ................................................................................................ 243 Rising Interest in Social Networks .......................................................244 Why Marketers (Should) Care About Social Networks....................... 245 Toward a More Rigorous Approach to Word-of-Mouth Marketing ............................................................................................. 247 Conclusion ............................................................................................256 References ............................................................................................256 Chapter 15 The Business Model as the Engine of Network-Based Strategies ...... 259 Christoph Zott and Raphael Amit Abstract ................................................................................................ 259 Origin and Focus of Business Model Research ................................... 262 Perspectives on Strategy and Value Creation ...................................... 263 Understanding the Business Model Concept in a Networked World .................................................................................266 Product Market Strategies and Business Models .................................269 Conclusions and Managerial Implications ...........................................271 References ............................................................................................272 Chapter 16 Extended Intelligence Networks: Minding and Mining the Periphery .........................................................................277 George S. Day, Paul J. H. Schoemaker, and Scott A. Snyder Abstract ................................................................................................ 277 Minding and Mining the Periphery ...................................................... 278 Research Literature: Learning, Networks, and Scanning ..................... 280 Types of Extended Intelligence Networks ...........................................283 Utilizing Existing Networks .................................................................284 Improving Your Extended Intelligence Network ................................ 288 The Leadership Challenge: Managing It All ....................................... 292 References ............................................................................................292 PART V ORGANIZING IN A NETWORKED WORLD Chapter 17 Network Orchestration: Creating and Managing Global Supply Chains Without Owning Them ................................299 Yoram (Jerry) Wind, Victor Fung, and William Fung Abstract ................................................................................................ 299 Unbundling Supply Chains................................................................... 301 The Four Flows: Where Atoms Meet Bits ........................................... 302 The Need for Orchestration ..................................................................306 Implications of Network Orchestration for Strategy and Competencies ................................................................................ 307 Three Roles of Network Orchestration ................................................ 309 Striking a Balance ................................................................................ 312 The Need for Orchestration ..................................................................313 References ............................................................................................ 314 Chapter 18 Managing the Hyper-Networked "Instant Messaging" Generation in the Work Force .......................................................... 317 Eric K Clemons, Steve Barnett, JoAnn Magdoff, and Julia Clemons Abstract ................................................................................................ 317 Social Networks ................................................................................... 318 Paradoxes of Modem Networks ........................................................... 321 Trends Shaping Modem Networks .......................................................323 Implications .......................................................................................... 327 References ............................................................................................ 332 Chapter 19 Missing the Forest for the Trees: Network-Based HR Strategies ........ 335 Valery Yakubovich and Ryan Burg Abstract ................................................................................................ 335 From an Atomized to a Network Approach to Human Resources ...... 337 Recruitment and Hiring: The Power of Weak Ties ..............................338 Training and Development....................................................................342 Performance Management: Creativity Versus Implementation ...........344 Retention .............................................................................................. 345 Conclusions .......................................................................................... 346 References ............................................................................................ 347 Chapter 20 Relating Well: Building Capabilities for Sustaining Alliance Networks .............................................................................. 353 Prashant Kale, Harbir Singh, and John Bell Abstract ................................................................................................353 The Key Decision-Points in Creating Relational Capability: The Philips Story ...............................................................356 Developing Alliance Capabilities: A Constant Work in Progress .......361 Conclusion and Implications ............................................................... 363 References ............................................................................................363 PART VI NETWORK-BASED SOURCES OF RISK AND PROFITABILITY Chapter 21 Networks in Finance ................................................................................ 367 Franklin Allen and Ana Babus Abstract ................................................................................................367 Applications to Finance ....................................................................... 369 Conclusion ........................................................................................... 379 References ............................................................................................379 Chapter 22 The Weakest Link: Managing Risk Through Interdependent Strategies ................................................................. 383 Howard Kunreuther Abstract ................................................................................................383 IDS Scenarios ...................................................................................... 385 Characterizing the Problem--Investing in a Chemical Plant ..............388 Developing Risk Management Strategies: Tipping and Cascading ...................................................................................... 390 Future Research ................................................................................... 393 Conclusion: Using Networks to Address Risks ...................................396 References ............................................................................................396 Chapter 23 Integration of Financial and Physical Networks in Global Logistics ............................................................................. 399 Paul R. Kleindorfer and Ilias D. Visvikis Abstract ................................................................................................399 Globalization and Implications for Logistics Infrastructure ............... 401 Structure and Evolution of Air Cargo and Maritime Logistics ........... 403 Financial Risk Management in Shipping .............................................. 405 Conclusion ............................................................................................. 413 References ............................................................................................. 414 Chapter 24 Telecommunications: Network Strategies for Network Industries? ...417 Kevin Werbach Abstract ..................................................................................................417 A Network-Based View of Telecom ..................................................... 418 Network Monists and Dualists: ATandT and Google ..............................421 The Modular Future ...............................................................................427 Conclusion: A Network View of Networks .......................................... 430 References ............................................................................................. 430 Chapter 25 Network-Based Strategies and Competencies for Political and Social Risk Management ........................................ 433 Witold J. Henisz Abstract ................................................................................................. 433 Sources of Information on Political and Social Risks ...........................436 Developing a Strategy to Manage Political and Social Risks ............... 440 Implementing Political and Social Risk-Management Strategies ......... 445 Conclusion: From Information Overload to Actionable Insight ........... 448 References ............................................................................................. 449 PART VII A DOUBLE-EDGED SWORD: CONTAGION AND CONTAINMENT Chapter 26 Terrorism Networks: It Takes a Network To Beat a Network............................................................................................... 453 Dr. Booz Ganor Abstract ................................................................................................. 453 Terrorism and Social Network Analysis ............................................... 455 Network Structure ................................................................................. 458 The Internet and Other Enabling Technologies .................................... 462 Countering Terrorist Networks ............................................................. 464 Implications for Management and Business ......................................... 468 References ............................................................................................. 469 Chapter 27 Global Diseases: The Role of Networks in the Spread and Prevention of Infection .............................................................. 471 J. Shin Teh and Harvey Rubin Abstract ................................................................................................471 Introduction ..........................................................................................472 Network-Based Perspective of Infectious Diseases ............................ 473 Controlling Global Infections Diseases ...............................................481 Conclusions: The Rising Challenge and Lessons from the Past ......... 487 References ........................................................................................... 489 Chapter 28 Lessons from Empirical Network Analyses on Matters of Life and Death in East Africa......................................... 495 Jere R. Behrman, Hans-Peter Kohler, and Susan Cotts Watkins Abstract ................................................................................................495 General Overview of Survey Data and Contexts ................................ 499 Social Networks and Life--The Diffusion of Family Planning ..........500 Social Networks and Mortality and Death--The Diffusion of Worry About HIV/AIDS.................................................................. 506 Conclusion ........................................................................................... 508 References ........................................................................................... 509 About the Authors ............................................................................. 513 Index ....................................................................................................537

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