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Flexibility and stability in the innovating economy

Author: McKelvey, Maureen Publisher: Oxford University Press (OUP) 2006.Language: EnglishDescription: 297 p. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0199290474Type of document: BookBibliography/Index: Includes index
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Book Asia Campus
Main Collection
Print HD45 .F54 2006
(Browse shelf)
900195751
Available 900195751
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Includes index

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Flexibility and Stability in the Innovating Economy Contents List of Figures List of Tables List of Boxes Contributors Preface 1 Introduction xi xii xiii xvii 1 Maureen McKelvey and Magnus Holmén 1.1 Introduction 1.2 Why this book? 1.3 Overview of chapters 1.3.1 Chapters in Theme 1: experimenting and inertia 1.3.2 Chapters in Theme 2: evolution and adaptation of structure 1.3.3 Chapters in Theme 3: innovating and technological transformation 1.4 Beyond this book THEME 1: EXPERIMENTING AND INERTIA 2 The New Craft Skills of Engineering: The Impact of Innovation Technology on Engineering Practice 1 3 11 12 14 16 18 25 27 27 28 32 33 38 42 Mark Dodgson, David M. Gann, and Ammon Salter 2.1 Introduction 2.2 Changing nature of engineering practice and knowledge 2.3 Case studies 2.3.1 Amp 2.3.2 Ricardo Engineering 2.4 Discussion and conclusions 3 Innovative Opportunities and Dependencies: Illustrations from Mobile Communications 48 Magnus Holmén, Mats Magnusson, and Maureen McKelvey 3.1 Introduction 3.2 Innovative opportunities 3.3 Innovative opportunities in 3G and i-mode 3.4 Dependencies in innovative opportunities 3.4.1 Perceived economic value 3.4.2 Perceived ability to mobilize resources 3.4.3 Perceived appropriability 3.5 Conclusions 4 The Great Experiment: Public-Private Partnerships and Innovation in Design, Production, and Operation of Capital Goods in the UK 48 49 53 58 59 61 63 66 73 73 75 81 83 86 88 89 90 91 97 99 99 101 103 104 106 107 109 111 114 117 Andrew Davies and Ammon Salter 4.1 Introduction 4.2 Empirical and theoretical background 4.3 Innovation in capital goods and repositioning for PPPs 4.3.1 The capital goods value stream 4.3.2 Repositioning in the value stream 4.3.3 Moving from unique to repeatable solutions 4.3.4 Challenges of providing PPPs 4.3.5 Impact of PPP on government departments and agencies 4.4 Discussion and conclusions THEME 2: EVOLUTION AND ADAPTATION OF STRUCTURE 5 Complexity, Evolution, and the Structure of Demand john Foster and Jason Potts 5.1 Introduction 5.2 Consumption networks not production functions 5.3 The economy is a complex rule-system 5.4 The growth of demand and the growth of economies 5.5 Correlated preferences 5.6 Analysis of economic networks 5.7 Orders of complexity 5.8 Micro--meso--macro 5.9 The complexity of consumption and demand 5.10 Evolution and aggregate demand 6 Self-Transformation, Self-Organization, and Evolutionary Adaptation in the Economic Process 121 121 128 135 140 144 148 152 J. Stan Metcalfe and Ronnie Ramlogan 6.1 Introduction 6.2 Some evidence for structural adaptation 6.3 Accounting for evolutionary adaptation 6.4 The logistic principle 6.5 Adaptation, complexity, and the problem of knowledge 6.6 The correlation of knowing 6.7 Conclusions 7 Changing Boundaries of Firms in the Evolution of the Computer Industry: Towards a History-Friendly Model 157 Franco Malerba, Richard Nelson, Luigi Orsenigo, and Sidney Winter 7.1 Introduction 7.2 The conceptual background 7.3 A brief discussion of the semiconductor and computer industries 7.4 Some theoretical statements on the changing vertical boundaries of firms 7.4.1 First prediction-vertical integration 7.4.2 Second prediction-vertical integration 7.4.3 Third prediction-vertical integration 7.4.4 Fourth prediction-disintegration 7.4.5 Fifth prediction-disintegration 7.4.6 Conclusions from the theoretical statements 7.5 The model 7.5.1 Computers 7.5.2 The market for components 7.5.3 Firms' behaviour and technical progress 7.5.4 Demand for computers 7.5.5 Vertical integration and specialization 7.5.6 The working of the model with two technological discontinuities in components 7.6. The simulations 7.6.1 The benchmark case: vertical integration 7.7. Conclusions 157 158 160 163 163 164 164 164 165 166 167 167 167 168 170 171 173 175 175 193 THEME 3: INNOVATING AND TECHNOLOGICAL TRANSFORMATION 8 The Effects of Technological Change on the Boundaries of Existing Firms 199 201 201 205 206 207 208 209 209 209 212 214 217 Paul L. Robertson and Gianmario Verona 8.1 Introduction 8.2 Technological stability and the boundaries of the firm 8.2.1 Core and distinctive competences 8.2.2 Transaction costs 8.2.3 Behavioural factors 8.2.4 Summary 8.3 Technological change and the boundaries of the firm 8.3.1 Dynamic capabilities 8.3.2 Dynamic transaction cost 8.3.3 Modularity and firm boundaries 8.4 Conclusions 9 Transitions, Transformations, and Reproduction: Dynamics in Socio-Technical Systems 227 Frank W. Geels and René Kemp 9.1 Introduction 9.2 Multilevel perspective and types of change 9.2.1 Reproduction 9.2.2 Transformation 9.2.3 Transition 9.3 Case studies 9.3.1 The hygienic transition from cesspools to integrated sewer systems in the Netherlands (1870-1930) 9.3.2 The transformation of Dutch waste management (1960-2000) 9.4 Conclusions and policy implications 9.4.1 Steering and management 9.4.2 Transition management in the Netherlands 227 229 234 235 235 236 236 243 249 251 252 10 Analysing Flexibility and Stability in Co-evolutionary Processes 257 Magnus Holmén and Maureen McKelvey 10.1 Introduction 257 10.2 Transformation as involving novelty, destruction, or renewal? 259 10.2.1 The character of change 260 10.2.2 Doing and interpreting empirical research 262 10.3 Co-evolutionary processes in the innovating economy 266 10.4 Discussion 274 Index 283

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