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The Social organization of sexuality: sexual practices in the United States

Author: Gagnon, John H. ; Michael, Robert T. ; Michaels, Stuart ; Laumann, Edward O.Publisher: University of Chicago Press, 1994.Language: EnglishDescription: 718 p. : Graphs ; 23 cm.ISBN: 0226470202Type of document: BookBibliography/Index: Includes bibliographical references and index
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Book Europe Campus
Main Collection
Print HQ100 .L38 1994
(Browse shelf)
001247770
Available 001247770
Total holds: 0

Includes bibliographical references and index

Digitized

The Social Organization of Sexuality Sexual Practices in the United States Contents List of Illustrations List of Tables Acknowledgments Prologue Part I Theoretical Background 1.1 A Social Scientific Approach to Sexuality 3 1.2 Scripting Theory: Explaining Sexual Content 5 1.3 Choice Theory: Sexual Decision Making 8 1.4 Network Theory: The Sexual Dyad 16 1.5 Interrelations among the Theories 24 1.6 Master Statuses and Master Relationships as Social Signals 30 The Study Design 2.1 Major Issues in Designing a Study of Sexuality in the Age of AIDS 42 2.2 On Privacy, Confidentiality, and Security 71 Part II Sexual Practices and Profiles of Sexual Expression 3.1 Sexual Practices 80 3.2 Sexual Techniques with Opposite-Gender Partners 96 3.3 Sexual Relationships and Contextual Action 121 3.4 Profiles of Sexual Expression 133 3.5 Conclusion 145 Appendix 3.1A Construction of the Religion Variable for Protestant Respondents 146 The Social Organization of Subjective Sexual Preferences ix xi xxi xxvii 1 3 1 2 35 3 75 77 4 148 5 The Number of Partners 172 5.1 The Number of Partners over Specific Time Intervals 175 5.2 The Cumulative Number of Partners, by Age and Time Period 194 5.3 The Number of Sex Partners before, during, and following First Union 203 5.4 Multivariate Analysis of the Number of Partners 216 Appendix 5.1A: Construction of the Variable PART 12 (Number of Partners in the Last 'Twelve Months) 221 Appendix 5.2A: Construction of the Variable PART18 (Number of Partners since Age Eighteen) 222 Sexual Networks 225 6.1 Master Statuses and the Partnering Process 228 6.2 Social Networks and the Partnering Process 233 6.3 Homophily among Noncohabitational Partnerships 243 6.4 The Consequences of Specific Partnering Strategies 254 6.5 The Structure of Between-Group Contact 262 6.6 Conclusion 266 Epidemiological Implications of Sexual Networks 269 Homosexuality 283 8.1 Prior Research on the Prevalence of Homosexuality 286 8.2 The Myth of 10 Percent and the Kinsey Research 287 8.3 Dimensions of Homosexuality 290 8.4 Measurement and Prevalence of Same-Gender Behavior, Desire, and Identity 292 8.5 The Interrelation of Same-Gender Sexual Behavior, Desire, and Identity 298 8.6 The Relation of Master Statuses and Same-Gender Sexuality 302 8.7 Conclusion 320 Formative Sexual Experiences 9.1 First Vaginal Intercourse and Youthful Heterosexuality 322 9.2 Forced/Coerced Sex in Adulthood 333 9.3 Adult and Adolescent Sexual Contacts with Children 339 9.4 Conclusion 347 321 6 7 8 9 10 , Part III Sex, Health, and Happiness 351 10.1 Health and Happiness 351 10.2 Sexual Correlates of Happiness and Health 357 10.3 Sexual Satisfaction 363 10.4 Sexual Dysfunction 368 10.5 Conclusion 374 Sexually Transmitted Infections 11.1 Lifetime and Annual Rates of STIs 378 11.2 Risky Partners and Risky Practices 391 11.3 The Sexual Behavior of Those Infected with STIs 422 11.4 Reactions to the Risk of Infection 427 Appendix11.1A: The Logistic 440 Sex and Fertility 12.1 The Pattern of Fertility 443 12.2 Fertility Control 448 12.3 The Outcome of Conceptions 455 12.4 Age at Birth of the First Child 465 12.5 Conclusion 473 376 349 11 12 442 13 Sex, Cohabitation, and Marriage 475 13.1 Age of Entry into a First Marriage or Cohabitation 476 13.2 The Choice of a Marriage or a Cohabitational Union 491 13.3 The Stability of Partnerships 496 13.4 Conclusion 508 Normative Orientations toward Sexuality 509 14.1 Different Normative Orientations 510 14.2 The Distribution of Orientations within Master Status Groups 518 14.3 Normative Orientations and Sexual Behavior 529 14.4 Normative Orientations and Sexual Preferences 536 14.5 Conclusion 537 Epilogue Appendix A: Sampling Procedures and Data Quality Appendix B: Comparisons of the NHSLS with Other Data Sets Appendix C: Text of the NHSLS Questionnaire 541 549 571 606 679 707 712 14 References Author Index Subject Index

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