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Innovating to learn, learning to innovate

Corporate author: Centre for Educational Research and Innovation Publisher: OECD, 2008.Language: EnglishDescription: 256 p. : Ill. ; 23 cm.ISBN: 9789264047976Type of document: BookBibliography/Index: Includes bibliographical references
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Book Europe Campus
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Print LB1060 .I66 2008
(Browse shelf)
001245578
Available 001245578
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Includes bibliographical references

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Innovating to Learn, Learning to Innovate Table of Contents Executive Summary.............................................................................................................11 Chapter 1. The Search for Innovative Learning Environments by Francisco Benavides, Hanna Dumont and David Istance (OECD Secretariat)........ 21 1.1. Introduction................................................................................................................ 21 1.2. Why looking for new learning approaches and environments?................................. 22 Competences and PISA ­ the argument for more successful learning of wider competence sets............................................................................................... 24 Learning sciences and contemporary societies and economies ­ the arguments for change....................................................................................................................... 25 Schools as organisations ­ weak knowledge management and innovative capacity....27 1.3. Different approaches to re-designing learning environments.................................... 28 Building on learning science research............................................................................29 Comparing learning models and approaches..................................................................30 The lessons provided by "alternative schooling"........................................................... 31 The inspiration of practice..............................................................................................33 Concrete innovative examples........................................................................................34 1.4. Is reform for far-reaching change possible?...............................................................38 Flexibility as resilience...................................................................................................39 From education-focused to learning and innovation-driven reform.............................. 40 References......................................................................................................................... 42 Chapter 2. Optimising Learning: Implications of Learning Sciences Research by R. Keith Sawyer...............................................................................................................45 2.1. Introduction................................................................................................................ 45 2.2. The standard model of schooling............................................................................... 46 2.3. The shift to the innovation economy..........................................................................47 2.4. Key learning sciences findings...................................................................................50 The importance of deeper conceptual understanding.....................................................50 Focusing on learning in addition to teaching................................................................. 52 Building on prior knowledge.......................................................................................... 52 Reflection........................................................................................................................53 Scaffolding learning....................................................................................................... 53 2.5. Design principles from the learning sciences.............................................................54 Customised learning....................................................................................................... 54 Diverse knowledge sources............................................................................................55 Distributed knowledge................................................................................................... 55 Curriculum..................................................................................................................... 56 The role of the teacher................................................................................................... 57 Assessment.....................................................................................................................57 2.6. The learning sciences and alternative models of learning.......................................... 58 2.7 Conclusion.................................................................................................................. 60 References.........................................................................................................................62 Chapter 3. Toward Research-based Innovation by Carl Bereiter and Marlene Scardamalia......................................................................67 3.1. Dimensions of difference...........................................................................................70 Amount of direction: from instruction to epistemic agency..........................................71 Emphasis on ideas versus activities............................................................................... 73 Individual versus community emphasis.........................................................................76 "Design mode" versus "belief mode".............................................................................78 Accommodation to external constraints........................................................................ 79 3.2. Comparing learning models and approaches.............................................................80 Annex 3.A.1: Educational Models and Approaches to Learning...................................... 84 References.........................................................................................................................88 Chapter 4. The Contribution of Alternative Education by Anne Sliwka.................................................................................................................... 93 4.1. Alternative education: a fragmented landscape.........................................................93 4.2. Global networks of alternative schools....................................................................... 95 4.3. Understanding the culture of learning in alternative forms of education................... 98 The conception of the learner........................................................................................ 98 The learning environment.............................................................................................. 100 The role of teachers........................................................................................................102 Curricula and the content of learning............................................................................ 104 The function and culture of assessment.........................................................................106 4.4. Alternative education in light of recent research in the learning sciences................ 107 References.........................................................................................................................109 Chapter 5. Situated Pedagogies, Curricular Justice and Democratic Teaching by Mar Rodriguez-Romero.................................................................................................113 5.1. Situated pedagogies and situated learning.................................................................115 5.2. Curricular justice........................................................................................................121 5.3. Democratic teaching and learning............................................................................. 126 5.4. Community construction and the educational professional ......................................130 5.5. Conclusion ................................................................................................................ 132 References.........................................................................................................................134 Chapter 6. The Construction of Learning Environments: Lessons from the Mexico Exploratory Phase by Juan Cassassus, Maria de Ibarrola, Lilia Perez-Franco, Juana M. Sancho-Gil, Marcela Tovar-Gómez, Margarita Zorrilla.................................................................... 137 6.1. Building appropriate education: an unachieved task.................................................139 6.2. Needs and emotions as driving forces....................................................................... 142 6.3. Building a meaningful learning model...................................................................... 147 6.4. Finding routes for change.......................................................................................... 149 6.5. Looking for pertinent education responses................................................................151 6.6. Reforms built from the field...................................................................................... 155 References.........................................................................................................................157 Chapter 7. What Makes Innovations Work on the Ground? by Maria Cecilia Fierro-Evans..........................................................................................161 7.1. Innovation as a managerial process........................................................................... 161 7.2. Features of innovation: building the intervention model...........................................163 Design and growth path................................................................................................163 The agent and the change process................................................................................ 164 Types of intervention ...................................................................................................165 7.3. Strengths found in the cases' origins and operations................................................. 165 7.4. Innovation targets and their action spaces: agents and the political processes......... 167 Rationale and legitimacy of the proposal..................................................................... 167 Political conditions: willingness and reality.................................................................167 7.5. Real room for conflict management and for different actors to make decisions...... 168 Consistency between aims and contents and decision making.................................... 169 7.6. Attitudes that foster innovations ...............................................................................170 References.........................................................................................................................172 Chapter 8. The Dynamics of Innovation: Why Does it Survive and What Makes it Function by Ines Aguerrondo............................................................................................................175 8.1. Existing pressures ..................................................................................................... 177 8.2. Gaps requiring innovation (or "the window of opportunity")................................... 178 Conditions of the structure........................................................................................... 178 Conditions of the current situation............................................................................... 179 8.3. Development of the proposal, preparation and participation.................................... 180 8.4. The politico-cultural feasibility................................................................................. 182 8.5. The feasibility of knowledge..................................................................................... 183 The scientific-professional dimension..........................................................................183 The organisational-administrative dimension ............................................................. 183 8.6. Concrete feasibility and resources available............................................................. 184 8.7. The role of general context and background............................................................. 186 8.8. Available courses of action........................................................................................187 8.9. The process of consolidation..................................................................................... 188 Appropriate atmosphere for innovation....................................................................... 189 Flexibility in the development of innovation............................................................... 190 8.10. Functionality of the innovation................................................................................192 8.11. The open roads (sustainability) ...............................................................................194 Responding to changes in context and avoiding the onset of routine.......................... 194 Reacting to the pressure of institutionalisation ........................................................... 195 The challenge of expansion.......................................................................................... 196 8.12. A new paradigm: under construction? ....................................................................197 8.13. Organisation of the administration.......................................................................... 199 8.14. Transition towards generalisation (or the vicious circle of the "two sets of logic") .................................................................................................200 . References.........................................................................................................................202 Chapter 9. Open Learning: A Systems-driven Model of Innovation for Education by Tom Bentley....................................................................................................................... 205 9.1. Introduction................................................................................................................205 9.2. Multiple dimensions...................................................................................................207 9.3. Creating human capital: a new global narrative for schooling?................................ 209 9.4. The dominance of the bureaucratic paradigm........................................................... 213 9.5. Why are bureaucratic models so resilient?................................................................ 214 9.6. Liberalisation and specialisation: responses to rising demand..................................219 9.7. Innovation through collaboration: learning from open systems................................222 References.........................................................................................................................229 Annex A. Summaries of the Four Mexican Case Studies.............................................. 231 Case Study 1: The Cerro del Judio Friendship Centre................................................. 234 Case Study 2: Regular Education Support Services Unit ­ USAER 8........................ 240 Case Study 3: Intelligent Classroom for Migrants....................................................... 245 Case Study 4: Ayuujk Polyvalent Integral Community High School ­ BICAP.......... 252

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