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Consumer sensory testing for product development

Author: Resurreccion, Anna V. A. Publisher: Aspen Publishers, 1998.Language: EnglishDescription: 254 p. : Graphs/Ill. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9780834212091Type of document: BookBibliography/Index: Includes bibliographical references and index
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Book Asia Campus
Main Collection
Print HF5415.2 .R47 1998
(Browse shelf)
900190978
Available 900190978
Total holds: 0

Includes bibliographical references and index

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Contents Consumer Sensory Testing for Product Development Consumer Sensory Testing for Product Development Preface 1 Introduction I. Consumer Testing A. Product Development B. Product Maintenance C. Product Improvement D. Product Optimization 11. General Requirements for Sensory Testing A. Facilities, B. Environmental Control 111. Computerization of the Sensory Laboratory IV. References xu 2 Sensory Test Methods I. Introduction 11. Acceptance and Preference Tests A. Acceptance Tests B. Preference Tests III. Methods Used in Acceptance and Preference Tests A. Paired Preference Tests B. Rating Tests C. Other Methods IV. Data Collection Methods A. Questioning and Observation Method B. Data Collection by Questioning C. Data Collection by Observation D. Factors Affecting Data Collection V. The Questionnaire A. Questionnaire Design B. Pretesting a Questionnaire C. Final Considerations VI. Types of Questions A. Semi-structured and Unstructured Questions B. Types of Scaled Used C. Criteria for Selection of Measurement Scales D. Hedonic Scale E. Demographic Information VII. References 3 Test Procedures I. Project Plan A. Requests for Assistance B. Objectives C. Test Selection D. Selection of Consumer Panel E. Test Schedule F. Samples G. Sample preparation ' H. Sample Presentation 1. General Guidelines for Preparation of Specific Foods J. Sample Number K. Number of Responses Per Sample L. Sample Coding Procedures 11. Product Evaluation and Data Collection A. Test Controls B. Writing Instructions and Briefings C. Start and Completion Dates D. Duplication of Forms E. Rewards and Incentives F. Data Analysis and Processing 111. References 4 The Consumer Panel 1. Introduction 11. Sampling A. Calculations for Sample Size 111. Panel Size for Various Consumer Tests A. Focus Groups B. Laboratory Tests C. Central Location Tests D. Home Use Tests IV. Panel Selection A. Demographic Characteristics B. User Group C. Irrational Rating Behavior V. Consumer Database Management A. Setup and Maintenance V1. Special Problems in Sampling A. Use of Trained Judges in Affective Test. B. Discrimination Testing to Screen Consumer Panelists C. Garbage In Garbage Out VII. References 5 Qualitative Methods-Focus Groups I. Introduction 11. Reasons for Conducting Focus Groups A. Optimization of a Product's Acceptance B. Early Assessment of a Concept or Prototype C. Facilitate Quantitative Research D. Gathering Extensive Information About a Product Category 111. Advantages and Disadvantages of Focus Groups A. Advantages of Focus Groups B. Disadvantages of the Focus Group IV. Role of the Project Leader V. Role of the Moderator A. Desirable Characteristics of a Panel Moderator VI. Observers VII. Participants A. Consumer Sample B. Recruitment C. Screening D. Attendance E. Incentives VIII. Physical Facilities A. Location of Facility B. Focus Group Facility C. Furnishings D. Reception Room IX. Other Considerations A. Food B. Structure C. Length of Sessions D. Taping of Sessions E. Props X. Focus Group Procedure A. Introduction B. RapportlReconnaissance C. In-depth Investigation D. Closure E. Analysis and Interpretation F. Reporting XI. Handling Special Problems in a Focus Group A. Dominant Participant B. Non Participators C. Unqualified Respondents D. Low Energy Groups E. Legal Issues F. Misuse of Focus Group Results XU. References 6 Quantitative Methods by Test Location-Sensory Laboratory Tests I. Introduction 11. Advantages and Disadvantages A. Advantages B. Disadvantages 111. Role of the Project Leader A. Dry-run and Briefing IV. The Consumer Panel A. Panel Size B. Recruitment of Panelists C. Screening D. Attendance q. Incentives V. Physical Facilities A. Location of the Facility B. Sensory Laboratory Facility C. Reception Room VI. Other Considerations A. Orientation of Panelists B. Preparation and Presentation of Samples C. Test Procedures VII. References 7 Quantitative Methods by Test Location-Central I. Introduction 11. Advantages and Disadvantages A. Advantages B. Disadvantages 111. Role of the Project Leader IV. Panel A. Panel Size B. Number of Panelists C. Recruitment V. Procedure VI . Test Facilities A. Reception Area VII. Other Considerations A. Dry-run and Briefing VIII. References 8 Quantitative Methods by Test Location-Mobile I. Introduction 11. Procedure 111. Advantages and Disadvantages A. Advantages B. Disadvantages IV. Role of the Project Leader V. Panel VI. Physical Facilities VII. References Location Tests Laboratory Tests 9 (luantltative Methods by Test Location-Home-Use I. Introduction 11. AQvantages and Disadvantages A. Advantages B. Disadvantages 111. Role of the Project Leader IV. Panel A. Panel Size B. Recruitment and Placement V. Facilities VI. Procedure A. Samples Tests B. Product Placement VII. Measurement of Product Acceptance VIII. Data Collection A. Personal Interview B. Self-Administered Questionnaire C. Telephone Interview IX. Conclusion X. References 10 Quantitative Methods by Test Location-Simulated Supermarket-Setting (SSS) Tests I. Introduction 11. Reasons for Conducting Simulated Supermarket-Setting Tests 111. Advantages and Disadvantages A. Advantages B. Disadvantages IV. Role of the Project Leader V. Panel A. Recruitment of Panelists B. Attendance C. Incentives VI . Physical Facilities A. Location of the SSS Facilities B. Simulated Supermarket Facility VII. Procedure A. Orientation of Panelists B. Test Procedure VIII. Other Consideration A. Dry-run and Briefing IX. References 11 Affective Testing W i Children I. Physiological and Cognitive Development in Young Children A. Early Preferences in Taste and Aroma B. Cognitive Development 11. Sensory Testing With Young Children A. Special Problems B. Training and Screening C. Sample Size D. Age Differences in Discrimination Abilities E. Age Differences in Performing Sensory Preference Tests 111. Panel A. Panel Size IV. Recruitment of Children A. Local Residents VI. Facilities VII. References 12 Statistical Analysis Methods I. Introduction 111. Hypothesis Testing A. Statistical Error IV. Selection of Computer Software V. Statistical Analysis of Consumer Data A. Exploratory Data Analysis B. Graphic Representation of the Data C. T-test D. ~ n a 1 ' ~ sdf Variance is E. One Factor Completely Randomized Design F. Multiple-factor Designs and Analyses VI. Data Relationships, Correlation and Regression A. Correlation Analysis B. Regression Analysis VII. Multivariate Methods A. Principal Components Analysis B. Factor Analysis C. Cluster Analysis D. Discriminant Analysis E. Canonical Analysis F. Multiple Regression G. Selecting the Best Method VIII. References 13 Quantification of Quality Attributes as Perceived by the Consumer I. Introduction 11. Strategic Approach 111. Acceptance and Preference Tests A. Consumer Affective Test Methods IV. Product Characterization A. Physicochemical Measurements B. Descriptive Analysis V. Modeling of Quality or Consumer Acceptance A. Graphical Methods B. Predictive Equations C. Response Surface Methodology D. Statistical Techniques VI. Conclusion VI. References Appendix A Checklist for Focus Group Study Appendix B Checklist for Consumer Laboratory Test Appendix C Checklist for Central Location Test (CLT) Appendix 0 Checklist for Home-Use Test (HUT) Appendix E Statistical Tables Index

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