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The Costs and moderators of affiliation-based status transfer

Author: Ertug, Gokhan INSEAD Area: Organisational BehaviourPublisher: Fontainebleau : INSEAD, 2008.Language: EnglishDescription: 100 p. ; 30 cm.Type of document: INSEAD ThesisThesis Note: For the degree of Ph.D. in management, INSEAD, May 2008Bibliography/Index: Includes bibliographical referencesAbstract: This dissertation studies the costs and moderators of affiliation-based status transfer. Chapter 1 studies the benefits high-status actors get from affiliating with lower-status actors. Using data on Formula One racing teams and their engine suppliers between 1992 and 1999, I find that high-status racing teams get higher quality engines and greater attendance from their engine suppliers (both of which enhance performance). The attendance effect is explained by the status advantage of the racing team over its engine supplier, rather than by the absolute status of the racing team. The relationship-specific benefits, i.e., greater effort and attendance, for the higher-status partner translates to higher costs for the lower-status partner, who expends such effort and attendance. Thus, it is more costly for an engine supplier to affiliate with a higher-status racing team. Chapter 2 analyzes the conditions of status transfer. What are factors that affect the amount of status transferred via affiliations, so that paying attention to these factors low-status actors can get higher status returns for the costs they expend? Using data on 155 free-jazz musicians and their releases between 1989 and 2004, I show that the exclusivity of a focal musician's affiliates substantially enhances the status the focal musician gains through affiliations. Furthermore, both the main effect of status transfer and the enhancing effect of affiliates' exclusivity are contingent on the visibility of the affiliations. Neither effect is statistically significant in less visible affiliations while both are significant in more visible affiliations. List(s) this item appears in: Ph.D. Thesis
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INSEAD Thesis Asia Campus
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For the degree of Ph.D. in management, INSEAD, May 2008

Includes bibliographical references

This dissertation studies the costs and moderators of affiliation-based status transfer. Chapter 1 studies the benefits high-status actors get from affiliating with lower-status actors. Using data on Formula One racing teams and their engine suppliers between 1992 and 1999, I find that high-status racing teams get higher quality engines and greater attendance from their engine suppliers (both of which enhance performance). The attendance effect is explained by the status advantage of the racing team over its engine supplier, rather than by the absolute status of the racing team. The relationship-specific benefits, i.e., greater effort and attendance, for the higher-status partner translates to higher costs for the lower-status partner, who expends such effort and attendance. Thus, it is more costly for an engine supplier to affiliate with a higher-status racing team. Chapter 2 analyzes the conditions of status transfer. What are factors that affect the amount of status transferred via affiliations, so that paying attention to these factors low-status actors can get higher status returns for the costs they expend? Using data on 155 free-jazz musicians and their releases between 1989 and 2004, I show that the exclusivity of a focal musician's affiliates substantially enhances the status the focal musician gains through affiliations. Furthermore, both the main effect of status transfer and the enhancing effect of affiliates' exclusivity are contingent on the visibility of the affiliations. Neither effect is statistically significant in less visible affiliations while both are significant in more visible affiliations.

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