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The environmental effects of trade in the transport sector

Author: Gabel, H. Landis INSEAD Area: Economics and Political ScienceIn: The environmental effects of trade; OECD, 1994 Language: EnglishDescription: p. 153-173.Type of document: INSEAD ChapterNote: Please ask us for this itemAbstract: In theory, liberal international trade and environmental protection are mutually compatible policy regimes. Both have the same objective - the efficient allocation of economic resources. If environmental resources were correctly priced at a point in time and intertemporally, free trade domestically and internationally would allocate them to the production of an optimal set of final goods and services, and it would allocate tasks to countries according to the principles of comparative advantage. To the extent that comparative advantage is determined by endowments of environmental resources, it follows logically that the loci of production will be determined at least in part by the ability of different geographical regions to absorb environmental damage in production at the lowest cost. Thus, free trade will have environmental consequences, but those consequences will be optimal in terms of economic efficiency
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In theory, liberal international trade and environmental protection are mutually compatible policy regimes. Both have the same objective - the efficient allocation of economic resources. If environmental resources were correctly priced at a point in time and intertemporally, free trade domestically and internationally would allocate them to the production of an optimal set of final goods and services, and it would allocate tasks to countries according to the principles of comparative advantage. To the extent that comparative advantage is determined by endowments of environmental resources, it follows logically that the loci of production will be determined at least in part by the ability of different geographical regions to absorb environmental damage in production at the lowest cost. Thus, free trade will have environmental consequences, but those consequences will be optimal in terms of economic efficiency

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