Normal view MARC view

Islamic finance: law, economics, and practice

Author: El-Gamal, Mahmoud A. Publisher: Cambridge University Press (CUP) 2006.Language: EnglishDescription: 221 p. : Graphs ; 23 cm.ISBN: 9780521864145Type of document: BookBibliography/Index: Includes bibliographical references and index and glossary
Tags: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Book Europe Campus
Main Collection
Print HG173.9 .E44 2006
(Browse shelf)
001233364
Available 001233364
Book Middle East Campus
Main Collection
Print HG173.9 .E44 2006
(Browse shelf)
500006823
Available 500006823
Total holds: 0

Includes bibliographical references and index and glossary

Digitized

Islamic Finance Law, Economics, and Practice Contents List of Illustrations Preface Glossary and Transliteration 1 Introduction Finance without Interest? 1.1 Distinguishing Features of Islamic Finance Prohibition-Driven Finance Jurists, Shari`a Boards, and Innovation Lawyers and Regulatory Arbitrage 1.2 Islamic Transactions Law as Common Law Precedents, Analogies, and Nominate Contracts Tradeoff between Efficiency and Legitimacy 1.3 Limits and Dangers of Shari`a Arbitrage Risk of Mispricing Legal and Regulatory Risks 2 page x xi xv 1 2 7 8 11 13 15 17 20 21 22 23 26 27 27 28 30 31 32 35 36 42 44 Jurisprudence and Arbitrage 2.1 Islamic Law and Jurisprudence The Canon: Qur'an, Tradition, and Consensus Juristic Inference (Ijtihad) and Benefit Analysis 2.2 From Classical to Contemporary Jurisprudence Jurisprudence, Revival, and Codification Institution of Fatwa and Islamic Finance 2.3 Arbitraging Classical Jurisprudence Shari`a-Arbitraging Classical Property Law Arbitraging Classical Contract Conditions Arbitrage, Ruses, and Islamic Finance 3 Two Major Prohibitions: Riba and Gharar 3.1 The Prohibition of Riba Canonical Texts on Riba Economic Substance of the Prohibition of Riba 3.2 The Prohibition of Gharar Definition of Gharar Economic Substance of Prohibition Insurance and Derivatives 3.3 Bundled vs. Unbundled Credit and Risk Sale-Based Islamic Finance 4.1 Basic Rules for Sales Trust Sales: Murabaha, Tawliya, Wadi `a Currency Exchange (Sail') 4.2 Same-Item Sale-Repurchase (Ina) Same-Item Trading in Ina and Tawarruq Custody Sale (Bay' Al-Uhda) and Sukuk Al-ijara 4.3 Cost of Funds: Interest-Rate Benchmarks Opportunity Cost for Conventional Fund Providers Viability of Islamic Benchmark Alternatives Derivative-Like Sales: Salam, Istisna; and Urbun 5.1 Prepaid Forward Sale (Salam) Parallel Salam Conventional and Synthesized Forwards 5.2 Commission to Manufacture (Istisna`) 5.3 Down-Payment Sale ( `Urbun) Vrbun as Call Option Leasing, Securitization, and Sukuk 6.1 General Lease Conditions Flexible-Rate Financing Subleasing, Repairs, and Insurance Costs 6.2 Asset-Backed Securities Leasing and Securitization Receivable Securitization and Sale of Debt Bundling Asset-Based and Debt-Based Securities: A Paradox 6.3 Asset-Backed Leasing Bonds (Sukuk) Credit-Rating Issues Reward Pledges and Gifts Revisited 6.4 Usufruct Sukuk 6.5 Sukuk Al-Salam 46 49 49 52 58 59 60 61 62 64 65 67 68 70 70 73 74 75 77 81 81 83 86 90 91 92 97 97 100 100 102 102 104 106 107 108 110 113 114 4 5 6 7 Partnerships and Equity Investment 7.1 Classical Types of Partnership Silent Partnership: Theoretical Workhorse of Islamic Finance Valid and Defective Silent Partnerships 7.2 Common-Stock Ownership "Islamic Screens" and Their Shortcomings Cleansing Returns Positive Screens and the Islamic Brand Name Islamic Financial Institutions 8.1 Banking and Islamic Banking Theoretical Structure: Two-Tier Silent Partnership Deposits vs. Loans: Trust and Guaranty 8.2 Insurance and Takaful 8.3 Two Sides of the Two Debates Shari`a Arbitrage vs. Islamic Prudential Regulation 8.4 Generic Agency Characterization of Financial Institutions Governance and Regulatory Solutions in Mutuality 9.1 Rent-Seeking Shari`a Arbitrage and Absence of Mutuality Potential for Mutuality in Islamic Banking Need for Mutuality in Takaful 9.2 A Call for Mutuality in Banking and Insurance Mutuality in Banking Mutuality in Insurance Beyond Shari`a Arbitrage 10.1 Shari`a Arbitrage and Criminal Finance 10.2 Shari`a Arbitrage at the Limit Benchmarking ad Absurdum Hedge-Fund Instruments ­ Shari`a-Arbitrage Style 10.3 Self-Destructiveness of Shari`a Arbitrage Declining Shari`a-Arbitrage Profit Margins Dilution of the "Islamic" Brand Name 10.4 Toward a New Islamic Finance Identity Macroeconomic Substance: Privatization Sukuk Mosque-Based Network of Financial Mutuals Positive Screens, Ethical Investment 117 117 120 122 123 125 133 134 135 137 138 144 147 151 152 153 162 163 166 170 171 172 173 175 176 177 178 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 188 190 193 213 219 8 9 10 Conclusion Notes Bibliography Index

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.
Koha 18.11 - INSEAD Catalogue
Home | Contact Us | What's Koha?