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Games in career guidance: effectiveness of using a small world simulation to develop social skills in the workplace

Author: Maxwell, Katrina ; Angehrn, Albert A.INSEAD Area: Organisational Behaviour ; Technology and Operations Management Series: Working Paper ; 2008/10/OB/TOM/CALT Publisher: Fontainebleau : INSEAD Centre for Advanced Learning Technologies (CALT) 2008.Language: EnglishDescription: 29 p.Type of document: INSEAD Working Paper Online Access: Click here Abstract: Success in the workplace is highly dependent on social skills. Nevertheless, although games are a fun and effective way to trigger learning, there appears to be a lack of realistic educational games which develop an awareness of the advanced social skills needed to succeed in one's career. In particular, young people, many of whom play video and computer games on a daily basis, should be highly receptive to a computer-enhanced approach to learning about effective social interaction in an organisational context, such as that found in the learning-by-doing management simulation experience which we describe in this paper. Although this simulation was initially developed for experienced managers, our quantitative research on a group of 14-17 year olds showed a significant measurable increase in their awareness of many advanced social skills in the workplace.
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Success in the workplace is highly dependent on social skills. Nevertheless, although games are a fun and effective way to trigger learning, there appears to be a lack of realistic educational games which develop an awareness of the advanced social skills needed to succeed in one's career. In particular, young people, many of whom play video and computer games on a daily basis, should be highly receptive to a computer-enhanced approach to learning about effective social interaction in an organisational context, such as that found in the learning-by-doing management simulation experience which we describe in this paper. Although this simulation was initially developed for experienced managers, our quantitative research on a group of 14-17 year olds showed a significant measurable increase in their awareness of many advanced social skills in the workplace.

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