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The Three ways of getting things done: hierarchy, heterarchy and responsible autonomy in organizations

Author: Fairtlough, Gerard Publisher: Triarchy Press, 2007.Edition: International ed.Language: EnglishDescription: 121 p. ; 25 cm.ISBN: 9780955008139Type of document: BookBibliography/Index: Includes bibliographical references and glossary
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Book Europe Campus
Main Collection
Print HD6954.5 .F357 2007
(Browse shelf)
001230931
Available 001230931
Total holds: 0

Includes bibliographical references and glossary

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The Three Ways of Getting Things Done Hierarchy, Heterarchy and Responsible Autonomy in Organizations Contents Acknowledgements Foreword 1 Introduction 1.1 The Hegemony of Hierarchy 1.2 Why I Wrote this Book 1.3 The Shape of the Book iii vii 1 1 3 5 2 A Basis for Hegemony 2.1 How Hegemony Works 2.2 Genes 2.3 Hierarchy in Organizations 2.4 The 'Great Man' 2.5 Tradition 6 6 7 9 10 11 3 What Organizations Need 3.1 Coordination of Ends and Means 3.2 System 3.3 Organizational Culture 3.4 Leadership 3.5 Power 3.6 'Exit' and `Voice' 3.7 Conclusion 13 13 14 15 16 17 20 20 4 The Three Ways of Getting Things Done 4.1 Hierarchy 4.2 Heterarchy 4.3 Responsible Autonomy 4.4 Complex Evolving Systems 4.5 Encapsulation 4.6 Critique 21 21 22 24 25 26 27 4.7 Resolving Disputes 4.8 Heterarchy Compared with Responsible Autonomy 4.9 Ideal Types 4.10 Are There Only Three Ways? 4.11 The University of Barchester 28 28 28 29 29 5 Advantages of Each of the Three Ways 5.1 Advantages of Hierarchy 5.2 Advantages of Heterarchy 5.3 The Evolution of Cooperation 5.4 Co-evolution 5.5 Pluralism 5.6 Using Diverse Talents 5.7 Advantages of Responsible Autonomy 33 33 35 37 38 39 39 41 6. Cultural Theory and Triarchy Theory 6.1 Grid and Group 6.2 Parallels with Triarchy theory 6.3 Conclusion 42 42 43 45 7 Blending the Three Ways 7.1 Contingency Theories of Organization 7.2 Donaldson's Contingency Theory 7.3 The Future of Work 7.4 Malone's Contingency Theory 7.5 Force-Based Organizations 7.6 Size as a Contingency 7.7 Conclusion 46 46 46 50 52 54 57 58 8 Drivers of Change 8.1 Practical Approaches 8.2 Ideas are Important 8.3 Skills 8.4 Democracy 8.5 Separation of Powers 8.6 Job Rotation 58 58 59 61 62 64 67 8.7 Project Leadership 8.8 Selection by Lot 8.9 Reward Systems 8.10 Semco 8.11 Enabling Infrastructure 8.12 Participation 8.13 Trust 8.14 Plasticity 8.15 Things that Help Heterarchy 8.16 Things that Help Responsible Autonomy 68 69 70 71 73 74 75 76 78 78 9 What is to be Done? 9.1 The Time is Ripe 9.2 How to Change 9.3 Role Models 9.4 The Centre for Computational Biology 9.5 TS plc 9.6 Save the Planet 9.7 The London Classical Orchestra 9.8 Heterarchical Practices Illustrated by These Stories 9.9 Conclusion 82 82 83 84 89 91 94 97 99 100 Glossary Notes Bibliogra phy About Triarchy Press Biography of the Author 102 108 115 120 121

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