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Elements of shipping

Author: Branch, Alan E. Publisher: Routledge 2007.Edition: 8th ed.Language: EnglishDescription: 504 p. : Ill. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9780415362863Type of document: BookBibliography/Index: Includes index
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Book Asia Campus
Main Collection
Print HC2000 .T7 B73 2007
(Browse shelf)
900181334
Available 900181334
Total holds: 0

Includes index

Digitized

Contents Elements of Shipping Elements of Shipping Preface to the eighth edition Acknowledgements 1 xiv* xvii Introduction 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 Scope of the book 1 Function of shipping 2 World seaborne trade and worldfeet 3 Challenges facing the shipping industry in the twenty-jrst century 6 2 The ship 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 Main features of hull and machinery 9 International navigation limits 13 International Convention on Load Lines 1966 16 Types of propulsion and future trends 17 Types and methods of tonnage measurement 19 International Convention on Tonnage Measurement of Ships 1969 20 3 Ship design and construction Ship design and future trends 22 Ship productivity 24 General principles and factors infuencing design, type and size of ship 28 Safety and other regulations 29 Statutory regulations 30 Survey methods 36 Harmonization of surveys 37 Vessel lengthening 40 Cruise vessels 41 viii Contents 3.10 General structure of cargo vessels 42 3.1 1 Economics of new and second-hand tonnage 43 4 Ships, their cargoes, trades and future trends 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 Types of ships 50 Liners 51 Tramps 52 Specialized vessels and their trades 56 77 5 Manning of vessels 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5 Introduction 77 Duties and responsibilities of the Master 81 Ship's oflcers and crew manning 84 IMO Convention on Standards of Training, Certi$cation and Watchkeeping (STCW) adopted 1984 88 Engagement and discharge of the crew 90 6 Customs house and ship's papers Introduction 93 E-commerce; customs 94 Value added tax 95 Intrastat 96 Export controls 96 Customs tariff 96 Customs Freight Simplified Procedures (CFSP) 97 New Export System (NES) 98 Unique Consignment Reference (UCR) 99 Customs reliefs 100 Importation and exportation of goods 102 Ship 's papers 105 Ship 's protest 114 7 Maritime canals and inland waterways 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.8 introduction 116 European inland waterways 11 7 The Suez Canal Authority 120 The Kiel Canal 122 The Panama Canal 123 The St Lawrence Seaway 126 The injluence of canals on ship design 127 Canal areas as points of economic growth 128 7.9 7.10 7.I1 7.12 8 Inland waterways 128 The Eurotunnel 129 The Scanlink projects 129 The Ghan (Melbourne-Darwin rail route) I29 131 Services performed by principal shipping organizations Introduction 13I International Association of Classijkation Societies 132 r International Association of D y Cargo Shipowners (Intercargo) 136 International Chamber of Shipping (ICS) I36 International Association of Independent Tanker Owners (Intertanko) I36 International Federation of Freight Forwarders Associations (FIATA) 138 International Energy Agency 139 International Maritime industries Forum (IMIF) 139 lnternational Maritime Organization 140 International Organizationfor Standardization ('SO) 148 International Petroleum Exchange (IPE) 150 International Ship Managers' Association (ISMA) I50 International Shipping Federation (ISF) 151 International Tankers Owners Pollution Federation (ITOPF) 151 Lloyd's Register of Shipping 153 Malta Maritime Authority 162 Nautical Institute 163 Norwegian International Ship Register 164 Norwegian Shipowners' Association 164 Oil Companies' International Marine Forum (OCIMF) 165 Organizationfor Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) 166 Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) 167 Passenger Shipping Association (PSA) 169 World Trade Organization (WTO) 169 Baltic Exchange 172 Baltic and International Maritime Council (BIMCO) 174 Freight Transport Association, incorporating the British Shippers' Council 1 77 8.28 United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) 177 9 Passenger fares and freight rates 9.1 9.2 9.3 9.4 9.5 Theory of passenger fares 180 Theory of freight rates and effect of air competition on cargo traffic 181 Relation between liner and tramp rates 193 Relation between voyage and time charter rates 194 Types of freight 194 10 Liner conferences 10.1 10.2 10.3 10.4 10.5 Introduction 197 Liner conference system 197 Deferred rebate and contract systems 198 Harmonization conferences 199 The future of the liner conference system in the twenty-first century 200 11 Ship operation Factors to consider in planning sailing schedules 202 Problems presented to shipowners by Juctuations in trade and unequal balance of trade 205 Fleet planning 208 Interface betweenfleet planning and ship survey programme 210 Relative importance of speed, frequency, reliability, cost and quality of sea transport 21 1 Indivisible loads 213 Ship and port security: ISPS Code and port state control 214 12 Bills of lading 12.1 Carriage of Goods by Sea Acts 1971 and 1992 21 9 12.2 Salient points of a bill of lading 223 12.3 Types of bills of lading 226 12.4 Function of the bill of lading 231 12.5 International Convention concerning the Carriage of Goods by Rail 234 12.6 Convention on the Contractfor the International Carriage of Goods by Road 236 219 12.7 12.8 Combined transport 236 Sea waybill and common short form bill of lading 237 13 Cargoes 13.1 Cargo stowage/packing overview 242 13.2 Stowage of cargo 243 13.3 Types and characteristics of cargo 248 13.4 Cargo and container handling equipment 253 13.5 Types of packing 262 13.6 Dangerous cargo 268 14 The shipping company 279 . 14.1 Size and scope of the undertaking 279 14.2 Liner organization 281 14.3 Tramp organization 292 14.4 Holding companies and subsidiaries, including ancillary activities of shipping undertakings 293 14.5 Operational alliances 294 14.6 Ship management companies 294 14.7 Ownership of vessels 295 14.8 Capitalization andjnance of shipping undertakings 296 14.9 Income and expenditure 299 14.10 Statistics 300 14.1 1 Freight forwarders 301 14.12 Chartered shipbrokers 305 14.13 Future of shipbroking 306 14.14 Ship's agent 307 14.15 Lloyd 's Register Quality Assurance, IS0 9001:2000 308 14.16 British Columbia Ferry Service Inc. 308 15 Charter parties 3 10 15.1 Demise and non-demise charter parties 310 15.2 Voyage and time charter parties 316 15.3 Approved forms of charter parties and related bills of lading 325 15.4 Worldscale 327 15.5 Voyage estimates 328 15.6 Sale and purchase of ships 332 16 Containerization 16.1 Introduction 346 16.2 16.3 16.4 16.5 16.6 16.7 16.8 16.9 16.1 0 Major container trades 347 Two container operators 348 Container ships; terminals 352 Container distribution 359 Container types 361 Non-containerizable cargo 372 Features o f containerization 3 76 Container bases 3 79 International Convention for Safe Containers 1972 (CSC) 380 3 82 17 Seaports 17.1 17.2 17.3 17.4 17.5 17.6 17.7 17.8 17.9 Role of seaports in the twenty-first century and factors driving change 382 Correlation between 20 leading terminals and service operators 386 Container port automation 389 R e growth of Chinese dominance in international trade 389 Floating terminals 390 Factors influencing the shipowner's choice of seaport 393 Relationship between ships and ports 396 Port state control 398 Port of Rotterdam Authority 399 18 Multi-modalism: global supply chain management and international logistics 18.1 18.2 18.3 18.4 18.5 Factors in favour of multi-modalism 401 Rationale for the development of multi-modalism 403 Features of multi-modalism 405 Multi-modalism strategy 408 Global supply chain management and international logistics 409 414 19 The international consignment 19.1 Factors to consider in evaluating the suitability of transport mode($ for an international consignment 414 19.2 Delivery trade terms of sale and the export contract 415 19.3 Receipt of export order 420 19.4 Progress of export order and checklist 423 19.5 Business-to-Business (B2B) and Business-to-Consumer (B2C) customers 428 20 Information technology and electronic data interchange 20.1 20.2 20.3 20.4 20.5 20.6 Introduction 430 Bolero 433 International Maritime Satellite Organization (INMARSAT) 434 Computerized and EDI-resourced shipping companies 440 Customs; e-commerce 443 Computerized Export Processing: Exportmaster 444 430 21 Ship management 2 1.1 21.2 21.3 21.4 21.5 21.6 21.7 21-8 21.9 21.10 21.11 Introduction 458 Marketing aspects of ship management 460 Fleet management 462 Technical aspects of ship management 464 Financial aspects of ship management 465 Purchasing aspects of ship management 467 Investment aspects of ship management 468 Ship management legal disciplines 469 ISM Code 470 Risk management in the modern shipping industry 471 Case study: Vector Maritime Systems 472 22 Political aspects 22.1 Flag discrimination 475 22.2 Flags of convenience 476 22.3 Subsidies 479 22.4 Contribution of shipping to invisible exports 482 22.5 Conclusion 482 Appendix: Shipping terms and abbreviations Index

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