Normal view MARC view

Social entrepreneurship: the art of mission-based venture development

Author: Brinckerhoff, Peter C. Publisher: Wiley, 2000.Language: EnglishDescription: 238 p. : Ill. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0471362824Type of document: BookBibliography/Index: Includes bibliographical references and index
Tags: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Book Asia Campus
Main Collection
Print HD62.6 .B75 2000
(Browse shelf)
900180887
Available 900180887
Book Europe Campus
Main Collection
Print HD62.6 .B75 2000
(Browse shelf)
001351643
Available 001351643
Total holds: 0

Includes bibliographical references and index

Digitized

Contents Social Entrepreneurship Social Entrepreneurship About the Author / xv Acknowledgments / xvi Chapter 1 Introduction / 1 A. The Need for Social Entrepreneurs in a Mission-Based Organization 1 1 B. The Intended Audience for This Book / 4 C. The Benefits of Reading This Book 1 5 D. Chapter-by-Chapter Overview / 5 E. How to Get the Most from This Book / 8 Chapter 2 The Benefits of the Social Entrepreneurism Model / 11 A. Defining Social Entrepreneurism / 1 1 B. The Link between Social Entrepreneurism and Business Development / 15 1. The Starting of an Entirely New Product or Service / 16 2. A Major Expansion of an Existing Product or Service / 17 3. The Expansion of an Existing Activity for a New Group of People / 18 4. The Expansion of an Existing Activity into a New Geographic Area / 19 5. The Purchase of an Existing Business / 20 6. The Merger or Partnership with an Existing Organization 1 20 C. The Uses of Social Entrepreneurism to Do More Mission / 21 D. The Benefits to the Organization / 22 E. The Risks of Not Using the Model / 24 1. You Just Chase Dollars / 24 2. You Make Poorer Resource Investment Decisions / 25 3. You Don't Keep Up with the Changing Needs of Your Market / 26 4. You Are Less Competitive / 26 5. You Are Less Mission-Capable / 26 Chapter 3 The Business Development Process I 31 A. The Seven Steps of the Not-for-Profit Business Development Process / 31 I . Review Your Mission / 32 2. Establish the Risk Willingness of Your Organization / 33 3. Establish the Mission Outcomes of the Business / 34 4. Idea Generation / 35 5. Feasibility Studies (Preliminary and Final) / 36 6. Business Plan (Including the Financials) / 36 7. Implementation Plan with Accountability / 37 B. A Social Entrepreneurship Readiness Assessment Tool / 39 Chapter 4 First Steps: Mission Outcomes, Risk, and Idea Generation / 43 A. Is the Venture Idea Consistent with Your Mission? / 44 1 . Review the Mission for Currency / 44 2. Review the Mission for Flexible Language / 45 3. If Needed, Update the Mission Statement / 45 4. File the Mission Statement with the Internal Revenue Service / 47 B. How Much Risk? / 47 C. What Will the Mission Return Be? / 49 D. Generating Business Ideas 1 50 Chapter 5 Feasibility Studies I 57 A. The Purpose of Feasibility Studies / 59 B. Preliminary Feasibility Studies / 59 1. Define What Your Product or Service Is / 60 2. Determine Whether Your Target Customer Will Want This Service or Product / 61 3. Explore the Industry of Which Your Service or Product Is a Part / 62 4. Make Sure That Your Organization Has the Core Competencies Necessary to Do the Job Well from Day One / 63 C. The Final Feasibility Study / 64 Final Feasibility Study Contents / 65 Chapter 6 The Business Plan / 71 A. The Need for a Business Plan I 71 B. The Contents of the Business Plan I 73 C. A Sample Business Plan I 75 Background Information I 76 I. The Summary I 81 The Organization I 8 1 The Service I 81 The Markets I 81 The Marketing Plan I 82 Financing Required I 82 11. The NFP, Enterprise Janitorial Services, and Its Business I 82 The Organization I 82 The Service I 83 The Target Market I 83 Potential Customer Reactions and Need for This Service I 83 The Sales Strategy I 84 111. The Market Description I 85 The Target Markets I 85 The Competition / 86 Price Comparisons I 87 IV. The Marketing Plan / 87 The Markets I 87 Customers I 88 Competitors I 88 The Macroenvironment of the Business I 88 Potential Pitfalls I 90 V. The Financial Plan 1 91 VI. Goals and Objectives 1 91 VII. The Appendix I 92 Chapter 7 Business Plan Financial Projections / 95 A. Getting the Numbers Right I 95 1. Use an Electronic Spreadsheet I 97 2. Consult Your Financial Manager I 97 3. Include All Your Costs I 97 4. Have an Outside Reviewer I 98 B. Developing Your Projections 1 98 1. Sales Target for the First Three Years 1 98 2. Pricing Information 1 99 3. Start-up Costs / 102 4. Operating Expenses / 102 5. Start-up Costs and Working Capital Needs / 104 6. Break-Even Analysis / 104 7. Pro Forma Profit and Loss Statement / 106 8. Pro Forma Cash Flow Analysis / 106 C. Sample Financials for Enterprise Janitorial Services / I08 Financial Objectives / 108 Financial Condition of Owner / 108 Notes to the Financials / 110 Break-Even Analysis / 1 10 Explanation for Income Projections / 110 Chapter 8 Applying the Lessons: A Step-by-step Business-Planning Exercise / 117 A. Getting Ready / 1 17 1. Product/Sewice Definition / 1 18 2. Definition of the Market / 123 3. Definition of the Target Market(s) / 123 4. Listing of Five Core Wants of the Target Market / 124 5. Listing of Core Competencies / 124 6. Reaching the Markets / 124 7. The Mission Outcomes of the Business / 125 B. Key Financials 1 1 25 1. Start-up Costs / 125 2. Initial Size of the Business / 125 3. Fixed Costs / 126 4. Variable Costs / 126 5. Volume Projections / 127 6. Cash Flow Projections / 127 7. Pricing-Single Item / 133 8. Pricing-Multiple Services / 133 9. Breakeven / 133 10. Income and Expense Projections / 136 1 1. Working Capital Needs / 136 C. Business-Planning Sequence / 136 Chapter 9 Financing Your Entrepreneurship / 147 A. Assessing Your Financing Needs / 148 1. What Are Your Start-up Costs? / 148 2. Working Capital Estimation / 149 3. Checking with the Cash Flow Projection / 151 B. Methods of Financing / 153 1. Before You See the Lender / 153 2. Kinds of Debt / 157 3. Other Sources of Capita1 / 161 C. Sources of Financing / 162 1. Commercial Banks / 162 2. Savings and Loans / 163 3. Credit Unions / I63 4. Program-Related Investments (PRIs) / 164 5. Tax-Exempt Bond Issuers / 164 D. Rules for Financing / 164 E. Dealing with Lenders / 167 1. How Lenders Think / 168 2. How Lenders See Not-for-Profits / 168 3. Seeking the Best Lender for Your Organization / 169 4. Developing and Maintaining a Good Relationship with Your Banker / 171 Chapter 10 Technicalities: Unrelated Business Income Tax and Corporate Structuring / 175 A. The Unrelated Business Income Tax / 176 1. The Definition of Unrelated and Related / 176 2. Exceptions to the IRS Rules / 178 3. A Profit Tax, Not an Income Tax / 179 4. Deciding Whether Your Business Is Subject to UBIT / 181 5. A Decision Checklist for the Unrelated Business Income Tax / 183 B. Uses of Corporate Structuring in Social Entrepreneurship / 183 1. Rules for Corporate Structures / 186 2. A Second Not-for Profit / 188 3. A For-Profit Subsidiary / 191 4. An Umbrella Corporation / 195 5. A Cooperative / 195 Chapter 11 Social Entrepreneurism for Funders / 201 A. Why Funders Should Embrace Entrepreneurism / 202 1. What Is Social Entrepreneurism? / 202 2. How Does Social Entrepreneurism Help Make Not-for-Profits Better? / 203 3. Why Should Your Organization Support Not-for-Profit Entrepreneurism? / 205 B. What Funders Should Do to Encourage Entrepreneurism / 205 1. Encourage Innovation / 208 2. Understand That Not All Ideas Work Out-Even Yours / 208 3. Provide Funding for Entrepreneurial Activities / 209 4. Encourage Lifelong Learning / 209 5. Go to Contract for Services / 209 6. Bid Stuff / 210 7. Don't Punish Efficiency or Good Management / 2 10 8. Fund Overhead / 2 1 1 9. End Match / 2 1 1 10. Don't Worry about What's Not in the Contract / 212 1 1. Encourage Competition, Not Just Collaboration / 2 12 Chapter 12 Final Thoughts / 21 5 A. Holding on to Your Core Values / 2 16 1. Markets That Move Outside of Your Values Envelope / 2 16 2. Customers That Demand Truly Unreasonable Changes in Policy or Program / 2 17 3. Chasing Dollars Instead of Mission / 219 4. Going for Short-Term Returns Instead of Long-Term Gains / 22 1 B. Making Sure That Mission, Not Just Money, Is the Bottom Line / 222 C. Final Thoughts / 224 Resources for Further Study / 229 Index / 233

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.
Koha 18.11 - INSEAD Catalogue
Home | Contact Us | What's Koha?