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Perspectives on political communication: a case approach

Author: Cohen Bell, Lauren ; Conners, Joan L. ; Sheckels, Theodore F.Publisher: Pearson , 2008. ; Allyn and Bacon, 2008.Language: EnglishDescription: 400 p. : Ill./Photos ; 23 cm.ISBN: 9780205508877Type of document: BookBibliography/Index: Includes bibliographical references and index
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Book Europe Campus
Main Collection
Print JA70 .C6 C64 2008
(Browse shelf)
001229685
Available 001229685
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Includes bibliographical references and index

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Perspectives on Political Communication A Case Approach Contents Preface xi xvi About the Authors CHAPTER ONE Introduction 1 Why Study Political Communication? 3 Why Study Political Communication Using Case Studies? Case Studies from a Multidisciplinary Perspective 5 Conclusion 5 4 CHAPTER TWO A Political Science Perspective 7 Political Science and Political Communication 8 Communication and the Constitution 10 Communication in Politics--Campaigns 12 Communication and Politics--Governing 16 The President 16 · The Congress 18 · The Federal Judiciary 21 Some Concluding Thoughts on Communication and Governing 23 Constructing Political Meaning 24 The Rest of the Book 26 CHAPTER THREE A Rhetorical Perspective 28 The Rhetorical Triangle 29 The Rhetor 29 Ethos 29 · Eloquence 30 · Stylization 32 · And the Rhetor Is? 33 The Audience 33 Pathos 33 · Audience Analysis 35 · Identification 35 · Particular versus Universal; Second Persona 36 · Constitutive Rhetoric 36 The Artifact 37 The Content 37 · Small-Scale Organization 40 · Large-Scale Organization 42 Style 45 · The Visual 47 iv CONTENTS Contexts 48 Speech Acts 49 · The Rhetorical Situation 49 · The Political Context 50 The Medium 50 · Social Movements 51 · The Episteme 52 · Against the Patriarchy 53 · DoubleVoiced Discourse; The Carnivalesque 54 · Other "Power-Down" Groups 55 Beyond Rhetoric Per Se Conclusion 57 55 CHAPTER FOUR A Mass Communication Perspective Mass Media and Political Campaigns 59 58 Issues of Campaign Coverage 60 · Other Campaign Media: Political Advertising, Debates, Cyberspace 62 Beyond Elections: News Media and Politics 67 Reporter Objectivity: Expectations and Challenges 67 · Reporters' Relationship with Government Officials 69 · Media Coverage of Courts 72 · The First Amendment and Press Regulations 73 Mass Communication Research and Political Communication 74 Media Effects and Politics 74 · Mass Communication Theories 76 Mass Communication Approach to Case Studies 79 CHAPTER FIVE Case One: The 1988 Presidential Election The Case 81 81 "Willie Horton" 82 · "Revolving Door" 82 · "Tank" 83 Dukakis Responses 84 The Political Science Perspective 85 Campaign '88 85 · Symbols in the 1988 Presidential Election Campaign 86 Winners and Losers 89 · Conclusion 89 The Rhetorical Perspective 90 Candidate Advertising and Ethos 90 · Dukakis's Weak Response 92 Conclusion 93 The Mass Communication Perspective 93 Sponsorship of Political Advertisements 94 · Impact of Negative Advertisements 94 News Coverage of Negative Advertisements 95 Conclusion 96 Conclusion 97 Additional Cases 97 CONTENTS V CHAPTER SIX Case Two: The 1998 Minnesota Gubernatorial Election 99 The Case 99 The Political Science Perspective 101 Ventura as Symbol 103 · Additional Explanatory Factors 104 Conclusion 106 The Rhetorical Perspective 106 Third-Party Candidates and Voter Attitudes 106 · Audience Analysis 107 Creating an Audience to Appeal to 108 · The Carnivalesque 108 Scapegoating 109 · Conclusion 110 The Mass Communication Perspective 110 News Coverage of Ventura's Campaign 110 · Political Advertisements and Campaign Finance 112 · Campaigning on the Internet 113 · Conclusion 114 Conclusion 115 Additional Cases 115 CHAPTER SEVEN Case Three: The 2000 Presidential Election 117 The Case 117 The Political Science Perspective 121 Postelection Mythmaking 123 · Conclusion 125 The Rhetorical Perspective 125 Assumptions about the Debates 126 · Reinforcing One's Support 127 Improving One's Ethos 128 · Gore's "Gaffe" 130 · Conclusion 131 The Mass Communication Perspective 131 News Media and Election Night "Predictions" 132 · The Media's Role in the 2000 Presidential Debates 133 · Impact of the Debates 136 · Conclusion 136 Conclusion 136 Additional Cases 137 CHAPTER EIGHT Case Four: The 2004 Presidential Election The Case 138 138 Internet Use in the 2004 Presidential Campaigns 138 · 527 Groups in the 2005 Elections 139 · Political Gaffes 141 vi CONTENTS The Political Science Perspective 143 What Went Right 144 · What Went Wrong 146 · Conclusion 146 The Rhetorical Perspective 147 The Dean Campaign and the Internet 147 · Dean's Declining Moment 149 The Candidates' Narratives 150 · Using a Candidate's Words against a Candidate 151 · Conclusion 153 The Mass Communication Perspective 153 Blogging and Political Campaigns 153 · Swift Boat Veterans for Truth 155 Dean's and Kerry's Gaffes 156 · Conclusion 158 Conclusion 158 Additional Cases 159 CHAPTER NINE Case Five: 2006 Midterm Elections 160 The Case 160 Maryland 160 · Missouri 161 · Montana 162 · New Jersey 163 Ohio 164 · Pennsylvania 165 · Rhode Island 166 · Tennessee 166 Virginia 168 The Political Science Perspective 169 Congressional Midterm Elections, Generally 170 · The 2006 Midterm Election 174 · Conclusion 175 The Rhetorical Perspective 176 Enthymemes 176 · Ethos 178 · Actions That Speak 179 · Conclusion 180 The Mass Communication Perspective 180 Political Advertising Spending 180 · Campaign Coverage 181 · Campaigns and Technology 184 · Conclusion 187 Conclusion 188 Additional Cases 188 CHAPTER TEN Case Six: Ronald Reagan's 1981 Inaugural Address The Case 190 Political Science Response 195 190 The Failure of Government 196 · The Triumph of American Individualism 197 Tying It Together 198 · Conclusion 199 The Rhetorical Perspective 199 Inaugural as Speech Act 200 · Inaugural as Genre 200 · The Reagan Style 204 Conclusion 205 CONTENTS vii The Mass Communication Perspective 205 Media Coverage of Reagan's Inauguration 206 · Competing Political News: Reagan's Inauguration versus the End of the Hostage Crisis 207 · Inauguration and Presidential Honeymoon 209 · Conclusion 210 Conclusion 210 Additional Cases 211 CHAPTER ELEVEN Case Seven: Clinton Responds to Lewinsky Scandal The Case 212 212 Timeline of Events of the Clinton-Lewinsky Scandal 212 · Clinton's Denial 213 Clinton' s Apology 214 The Political Science Perspective 215 Presidential Power 216 · The Badly Handled Cover-Up 216 · The Effects of the Scandal on the Clinton Presidency 218 · The Effects of the Scandal on the Presidency More Generally 218 · Conclusion 219 The Rhetorical Perspective 220 Political Apologia 220 · Clinton's January Remarks 223 · Clinton's August Address 223 · Conclusion 226 The Mass Communication Perspective 226 News, Gossip, and Scoops 226 · "Darts and Laurels" for News Coverage 228 Media Theory and the Clinton/Lewinsky Scandal 229 · Conclusion 231 Conclusion 231 Additional Cases 232 CHAPTER TWELVE Case Eight: George W. Bush Responds to Terrorism 233 The Case 233 The Political Science Perspective 239 The Crisis Presidency 240 · Conclusion 243 The Rhetorical Perspective 243 Bush's Immediate Response as Epideictic 244 · Bush's Call for Attack on Afghanistan 244 · Bush's Call for Action against Iraq 245 · Bush's "Victory" Address 246 · Bush and Genre Confusion 246 · Bush's Language 248 Bush and Identification 249 · Conclusion 250 The Mass Communication Perspective 250 News Media Coverage of War in Iraq 250 · Reporters' Relationships 253 Conclusion 256 Conclusion 256 Additional Cases 257 viii CONTENTS CHAPTER THIRTEEN Case Nine: Clarence Thomas's Confirmation Hearing 258 The Case 258 The Political Science Perspective 266 The Hill-Thomas Spectacle 268 · Conclusion 270 The Rhetorical Perspective 270 Males and Clarence Thomas 271 · Females and Anita Hill 274 · The Nature of Congressional Hearings 275 · Conclusion 276 The Mass Communication Perspective 277 Focus on Clarence Thomas Hearing Coverage 277 · Which "Soap Opera" to Air? 280 · Cameras in the Supreme Court 280 · Conclusion 281 Conclusion 281 Additional Cases 282 CHAPTER FOURTEEN Case Ten: The GOP's "Reverse Filibuster" Over George W. Bush's Nominees The Case 283 Excerpt from the Debate 284 283 The Political Science Perspective 287 Deconstructing the "Reverse Filibuster" 289 · The Political Spectacle of the Reverse Filibuster 291 · Winners and Losers in the Senate Debate 292 The Rhetorical Perspective 293 How Congressional Debates Have Been Viewed 293 · The Debate's Surface 294 · The Designative Claims 294 · The Definitive Claims 294 The Evaluative Claims 295 · The Advocative Claims 297 · Beneath the Surface of the Debate 297 · "Carnivalesque" 298 · Conclusion 298 The Mass Communication Perspective 299 Media Attention 299 · Newsworthiness 301 · Playing to the Camera? Attracting Media Attention 302 · C-SPAN: Gavel-to-Gavel Coverage 303 Impact of Filibuster Coverage on Audience 305 · Conclusion 305 Conclusion 305 Additional Cases 306 CHAPTER FIFTEEN Case Eleven: Texas v. Johnson, 491 U.S. 397 (1989) The Case 307 The Political Science Perspective 312 Flag Protection as Symbolic Politics 314 · Conclusion 316 307 CONTENTS ix The Rhetorical Perspective 316 Describing the Legal Arguments 316 · Critiquing the Legal Arguments 319 Conclusion 321 The Mass Communication Perspective 322 Media Coverage of Texas v. Johnson 322 · The Supreme Court and Agenda Building 325 · Conclusion 326 Conclusion Additional Cases 327 327 CHAPTER SIXTEEN Case Twelve: The Gay-Lesbian Rights Movement The Case 328 The Political Science Perspective 333 328 The Marriage Issue 334 · Gay Rights in Context 336 · Conclusion 337 The Rhetorical Perspective 338 Traditional Texts 338 · Crucial Moments 339 · Rhetorical Leaders 340 Confrontational Strategies 341 · Paths in Time 341 · Inward Direction 342 Different Values at Different Times 343 · Dependent on Those with Power 343 Conclusion 344 The Mass Communication Perspective 345 Media Coverage of Social Movements 345 · Media Coverage of AIDS 346 Media Coverage of Gay Marriage 348 · Newsroom Decisions 349 · Conclusion 350 Conclusion 350 Additional Cases 351 CHAPTER SEVENTEEN Case Thirteen: Politics in Popular Culture 352 The Case 352 Comedy and Politics 352 · Fiction and Politics 355 The Political Science Perspective 357 Political Socialization 358 · The Regulatory Context 359 · Conclusion 360 The Rhetorical Perspective 360 The Messages Popular Culture Sends 361 · Politicians' Use of Popular Culture 364 · Conclusion 365 The Mass Communication Perspective 365 Blurring of News and Entertainment 366 · The West Wing: Fiction and Images of the Presidency 368 · Conclusion 369 Conclusion 370 Additional Cases 370 x CONTENTS CHAPTER EIGHTEEN Conclusion 371 What are "the Basics" of Political Communication? 371 Elections 371 · The Presidency 372 · The Legislature 373 The Judiciary 374 · Social Movements 374 · Popular Culture 374 What Do the Three Disciplinary Perspectives Offer? What Insights did Those Perspectives Give the Reader? Conclusion 378 375 376 Selected Bibliography Index 387 379

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