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Measuring the value of point-of-purchase marketing with commercial eye-tracking data (RV of 2002/85/MKT)

Author: Chandon, Pierre ; Hutchinson, Wesley J. ; Bradlow, Eric T. ; Young, Scott H.INSEAD Area: Marketing Series: Working Paper ; 2007/22/MKT/ACGRD Publisher: Fontainebleau : INSEAD, 2007.Language: EnglishDescription: 46 p.Type of document: INSEAD Working Paper Online Access: Click here Abstract: In today's cluttered retail environment, creating consumer pull through memory-based brand equity is not enough; marketers must also create "visual equity" for their brands (i.e., incremental sales triggered by in-store visual attention). In this paper, we show that commercial eye-tracking data, analyzed using a simple decision-path model of visual attention and brand consideration, can separately measure memory-based and visual equity of brands displayed on a supermarket shelf. In the two product categories studied, juices and detergents, we find that in-store visual attention doubles, on average, the memory-based probability of consideration. Additionally, our empirical applications and normative analyses show how separating memory-based and visual equity can help improve managerial decisions about which brands to select for enhanced point-of-purchase marketing activities. Previous title: Unseen is unsold: assessing visual equity with commercial eye-tracking data (RV of 2001/19/MKT) - Chandon, Pierre;Hutchinson, J. Wesley;Yo - 2002 - INSEAD Working Paper
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In today's cluttered retail environment, creating consumer pull through memory-based brand equity is not enough; marketers must also create "visual equity" for their brands (i.e., incremental sales triggered by in-store visual attention). In this paper, we show that commercial eye-tracking data, analyzed using a simple decision-path model of visual attention and brand consideration, can separately measure memory-based and visual equity of brands displayed on a supermarket shelf. In the two product categories studied, juices and detergents, we find that in-store visual attention doubles, on average, the memory-based probability of consideration. Additionally, our empirical applications and normative analyses show how separating memory-based and visual equity can help improve managerial decisions about which brands to select for enhanced point-of-purchase marketing activities.

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