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Innovation and entrepreneurship in Japan: politics, organizations, and high technology firms

Author: Ibata-Arens, Kathryn C. Publisher: Cambridge University Press (CUP) 2005.Language: EnglishDescription: 251 p. : Graphs ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0521856442Type of document: BookBibliography/Index: Includes bibliographical references and index
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Book Europe Campus
Main Collection
Print HD45.42 .J3 I33 2005
(Browse shelf)
001221757
Available 001221757
Total holds: 0

Includes bibliographical references and index

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Innovation and Entrepreneurship in Japan Politics, Organizations, and High Technology Firm Contents List of figures List of tables Acknowledgments Abbreviations 1 Introduction 1.1 Introduction 1.2 Two stories: Samco and Ikeda 1.3 Regional variations in Japan's national innovation system 1.4 Innovative communities: basic ingredients and sufficient conditions 1.5 The book's argument: local political economy of innovative communities 1.6 Outline of the book 2 Regions and firms 2.1 Introduction 2.2 Regions: industries, products, and trends 2.3 Innovative levels of high technology firms 2.4 Firm-level strategies 2.5 Firms in Ota 2.6 Firms in Higashi Osaka 2.7 Firms in Kyoto 3 Innovation theory: firms, regions, and the Japanese state 3.1 Innovation: definition, measures, and theories 3.2 Firm-level innovation in Japan 3.3 Flexible production 3.4 Flexible specialization page x xii xiii xv 1 1 2 7 9 10 14 20 20 22 25 28 30 35 40 54 54 59 61 67 viii Contents 3.5 Industrial districts 3.6 Local networks 3.7 Comparing theories of innovation 3.8 Conclusion: bringing the local (more fully) back in? 4 Japan's quest for entrepreneurialism 4.1 The Cluster Plan 4.2 Executives and (former) bureaucrats 4.3 1990s: bad policy, poorly implemented 4.4 2000s: when all else fails, go to Harvard 4.5 What's "new" about the Cluster Plan? 4.6 Mid-2000s: checking on the patient 4.7 Conclusion: too much Gesellschaft and not enough Gemeinschaft 5 Networks and firms 5.1 Introduction 5.2 Overview of firm experiences 5.3 Networks in Ota Ward 0-Net 5.4 Networks in Higashi Osaka: TOPS 5.5 Networks in Kyoto: Kiseiren and its spin-offs 5.6 Conclusion: seeds of change 6 The Kyoto Model 6.1 What is the Kyoto Model? 6.2 Serendipity in history 6.3 Model firms 6.4 Levels of the Model: region, firm, entrepreneur 6.5 A model for other places? 7 Regions in comparison 7.1 Introduction: building innovative communities 7.2 Core constructs 7.3 Hypotheses: people, institutions, and innovation 7.4 St. Louis: the bio-belt of the American Midwest 7.5 Entrepreneur and firm-level challenges: a summary 7.6 Innovative coalitions and local visionaries 7.7 What it takes to move the region forward 7.8 St. Louis and Kyoto compared 7.9 Germany 74 78 81 85 92 92 93 99 101 105 110 111 114 114 121 122 125 127 132 138 138 139 141 148 159 162 162 164 166 168 176 184 186 187 190 Contents 7.10 China 7.11 Conclusion: hypotheses in comparative perspective 8 Conclusion 8.1 The socio-political foundations of regional innovation systems 8.2 Firms 8.3 Regions 8.4 Innovation theory 8.5 National Cluster policy 8.6 Networks 8.7 Comparative lessons APPENDIX 1 Methodology 2 Global scope of entrepreneurial activity: top fifteen countries 3 Management strategies of semi-Kyoto Model firms References Index ix 194 198 205 205 206 206 207 208 209 213 214 222 225 228 242

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