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Communities dominate brands: business and marketing challenges for the 21st century

Author: Ahonen, Tomi T. ; Moore, AlanPublisher: Futuretext, 2005.Language: EnglishDescription: 274 p. : Graphs ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0954432738Type of document: BookBibliography/Index: Includes bibliographical references and index
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Book Europe Campus
Main Collection
Print HF5415.3 .A46 2005
(Browse shelf)
001192677
Available 001192677
Total holds: 0

Includes bibliographical references and index

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Communities Dominate Brands Business and Marketing Challenges for the 21st Century Contents Foreword by Stephen C Jones Acknowledgements Chapter 1 ­ Introduction On the Road to Engagement All the rules are changing From a Networked Age to the Connected Age Brands in paralysis Enter the community Bloggers, garners or Gen-C? Why us An American angle It's all about dealing with change Dominate! xix xxi 1 1 3 5 6 7 7 8 8 9 Chapter 2 -- Society Changing Discontinuity, does it hurt? Automobiles, search, locks, shoes, TV, text messaging A -- Values changing Death of intimacy Self-actualised people Fundamental shift for businesses B -- Healthy cynicism Geography no longer a limiting factor Choice Map your positioning Nothing stays neutral for long Communication: guilty until proven innocent Curiosity Polemic on Search by Axel Chaldecott C -- Digitally empowered activism Brands are punished Cannot hide Good night, Kryptonite Nike vs Blackspot 11 11 12 12 14 15 15 15 16 16 17 18 18 19 19 20 20 21 Contents D -- Digital convergence The battle for office A battle royal for the home Battle for the pocket, handbag E -- Mobile cultures Our main tool for contact Who is digital gatekeeper Summing up society Case -- Transistor Project 22 23 24 25 25 26 26 27 Chapter 3 -- Business entities transforming From dinosaur to puma TV, music, airlines, sports, newspapers, telecoms A -- Digitalisation Not by TV but broadband Punctuated equilibrium B -- Music moves online Music on digital front line A look back Digitalisation opened Pandora's box Ringing tones best success in music Music kiosks Disintermediation C -- Create marketspace Requires vision and courage Need creativity D -- Newspapers into the abyss? At wrong end of digital divide Customer touch points Power of personalisation What business are you in Community generating material E -- Selected other trends Providers become commodities Differentiate or die Just in time vs just in case An end to business Case -- Apple iTunes 29 29 30 30 31 31 32 33 33 34 34 35 35 36 37 37 38 39 40 40 41 41 42 43 44 44 Contents Chapter 4 ­ Services and products fragmenting A street brawl without any rules Cameras, music, movies, newsmedia, airlines, cosmetics A ­ Speed of change Disruptive technologies Sudden success of cameraphones Wedding photos on cameraphone? Music and new media B ­ Fragmentation Repackaging TV news Can the can Non-traditional competitors C ­ Market effects Ever faster speed to market Increasing variety Airline inventory efficiency Beauty on the web All other industries beware D ­ Customers changing Compare with bricks and mortar goods Embracing emerging media Customers surf between media Sum up the fragments Case ­ The Guinness Visitor Centre Dublin 47 47 48 49 50 51 52 52 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 58 58 59 59 59 60 61 61 Chapter 5 ­ The emerging virtual economy Magic kingdoms for us and our children Virtual worlds, videogaming, search, ratings, e-Commerce A ­ Simulators Jet pilots Business simulations B ­ Virtual pets Tamagotchi Tamagotchi mutations Virtual friends Bees and horses Superduper stable Real money out of games 63 63 64 64 65 65 65 66 67 67 68 Contents C ­ Virtual worlds Economics of Virtuality Real fans for virtual stars D ­ Cheating wins Rules made for breaking Copying illegally and legally E ­ Virtual marketplaces Search Rating systems m-Learning Buy and sell Real goods sold through virtual worlds The mobile phone and intangible services Real end to virtuality Case ­ Habbo Hotel 69 69 71 71 72 72 73 74 74 75 76 77 77 78 78 Chapter 6 ­ Delivery channels splintering Battle of the channels Newsagents, department stores, video rental, internet, TV A ­ Splinter and converge Multiple channels Converging Disintermediation B ­ Retraining retail Where is the old store I used to know? Encroachment everywhere Virtual hair cuts? Pay to buy? Atypical digital pioneers Video rental going virtual C ­ Rethinking context Shoppa-tainment? D ­ Rebel network The anarchy-net Dog-net The hippie-net Network of networks Free forever Why internet so disruptive Biggest community rules 81 81 81 82 82 83 83 84 85 85 85 86 87 87 87 88 88 89 90 90 91 92 Contents E ­ The future of TV The end of the TV schedule End of the thought monopoly End of the channel Case ­ SMS to TV Chat 93 94 95 96 96 Chapter 7 ­ Blogging Everyone a journalist Automobiles, newsmedia, sports, festivals, politics A ­ Blogging for beginners How blogging works What blogging delivers Blogosphere Comment on non-commercial blogs B ­ Truth police Reporter or blogger? C ­ Moblogging What is Moblogging? Mobilising Brighton Virtual Festival D ­ Blogs and TV Consumers join communities E ­ Business and blogs Corporate fear Branding and blogs Blogging only beginning Concluding blogging Case ­ Kryptonite Locks 99 99 100 102 103 104 104 105 106 106 107 108 109 109 109 110 111 112 113 Chapter 8 ­ Customers changing Brand polygamists or worse Education, texting, TV, books, gaming, art, restaurants A ­ The newly independent customer Self-actualisation People don't want to be told Sceptical of marketing messages Giving feedback to the channel Varying feedback loops Lifelong learning 115 115 116 117 117 117 118 118 Contents B ­ Crave entertainment Attention spans ever shorter Need entertainment Back to books? Natural garners C ­ Want to participate Generate own content Sense of belonging D ­ How to group customers Companies from Mars, customers from Venus The age of perfect customer insight Splintered into ever smaller segments Beyond segment of one E ­ Unplugged Reachability F ­ New concepts of loyalty Brand-promiscuous Neo-altruistic brands Summing up consumers Case ­ Oh My News 119 119 120 121 121 122 123 124 124 125 127 127 128 128 129 130 131 131 132 132 Chapter 9 ­ Generation-C The Connected Community Text messaging, fashion, gaming, politics, dating, telecoms A ­ Defining Generation-C The community in your pocket Being part of Generation-C What age is Gen-C Gen-C rapidly growing B ­ Generation text Adults don't get it Less tobacco, less candy C ­ Personal attributes of Gen-C More aware Seek knowledge for themselves Very sceptical of marketing messages Garners First generation to grow up with digital feedback channels Smaller tribes SMS and Dating 135 135 136 136 137 138 139 139 140 141 141 141 142 143 144 146 146 Contents Why not a simple phone call? Ease the pain Memories in 160 characters D -- Communities of the community generation Change in behaviour Sharing E -- Are not like their parents Why didn't you answer the phone? I see you Generate own content My identity Who may use the phone My phone my money Still not convinced? Case -- Star Text 146 147 147 147 148 149 149 150 150 151 151 151 152 152 153 Chapter 10 -- Advertising in crisis If we say it just one more time Television, advertising, music, movies A -- Industry in crisis Consumed by advertising Fast forward past ads Viewer numbers in real time Customers less loyal Need to be entertaining B -- TV advertising changing False sense of security Involvement Viewers disappearing, money too Death of mass media? C -- TV ad economics Heads I win, tails you lose New income for TV New value chains D -- Call for creativity From push to pull Orange Wednesdays Integrated marketing communications Ending advertising Case -- Tango soft drinks 155 155 156 157 158 159 159 160 160 161 161 162 163 163 164 164 165 166 167 168 169 169 Contents Chapter 11 ­ Branding losing its power Is anyone listening? Television, soft drinks, music, retail, movies, automobiles A ­ Branding in crisis Growth of branding Context and Meaning An empowered consumer Need to work harder B ­ Branding changing too Brand extensions Coca-Cola Music C ­ Lost at sea without a compass What is my message? Gone in 30 seconds Marketing must change to meet the new world D ­ The truth, you can't handle the truth Brands, who has the control? Where is the real influence? Co-creation Do you want to compete on price? Brand needs to add value Summing up branding Case ­ Thomas Cook TV 171 171 172 172 172 173 174 175 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 183 184 185 185 Chapter 12 ­ Emergence of the Community Trust your friend Music, telecoms, politics, dating, shoes A ­ Connected Age Half step into the Community Addictiveness of connectedness Now sharing information is power B ­ Smart mobs Always spontaneous Flash mobbing Simultaneous parallel networks Virtual schizophrenics Information society C ­ The Four C's Commerce Community 187 187 188 189 190 191 191 192 193 194 194 194 195 195 Contents Commerce and Community moving closer Culture Connectivity Culture and Connectivity coming closer Convergence in the 4 C's The heart of the 4C's D ­ Power of community Bigger is Better Dating communities Testing new products and services Connectors and Evangelists Introducing Alpha User Alpha User is not same as Early Adopter Managing communities Concluding Communities Case ­ howies 196 196 197 197 198 199 199 199 200 200 201 201 202 203 203 204 Chapter 13 ­ Communities dominate brands Companies from Mars, Customers from Venus Newsmedia, automobiles, tourist guides, IT, wineries A ­ Slow death of branding and advertising B ­ Communities self-generating People prefer opinions of community Trust word of mouth Community rapidly learning C ­ From sermon to discussion Pulpit preaching is dead From monologue to dialogue Cannot ignore community D ­ Communication model revised Traditional communication model Communities are the counterforce Act as filtering element Preferred channel becomes feedback loop Balance achieved Imagine snowboard advertising E ­ Power of co-creation Viral marketing F ­ Harnessing community power Connected generation can kill brand success Change has vested interests lined up against it 207 207 209 209 210 211 211 211 212 213 214 215 216 216 216 218 218 219 220 221 222 222 Contents Customer evangelists The new customer Dominate! Case ­ Twins Mobile Music Service 223 224 224 225 Chapter 14 ­ From disruption to engagement Capitalising on Communities TV, e-business, aerospace, electronics, music A ­ End of interruption Revolution will not be on TV Communities cannot be ignored We can build it Death of interruptive advertising B ­ Enter engagement Create new marketspaces Invite the customer to participate A philosophy of acceptance Continuous improvement Survival of the fastest Ever wanted to design airplanes? Won't cost much Plain grass-roots contacts Activate with digital communication channels C ­ Recruit your evangelists 2% are your influencers Many proxies for Alpha Users Bloggers are influencers Fan club members are influencers Follow the Twins Find your most passionate fans D ­ Engagement is inevitable Intellectually mature E ­ A profession disintermediated A revolution in marketing skills Focus shift from individual to society New management tools and metrics Three shifts in the marketing paradigms You will be assimilated Final thoughts Case ­ Orange bicycles 227 227 228 228 229 229 230 230 230 232 232 233 233 235 235 236 236 237 237 238 239 239 240 241 241 242 242 243 244 244 244 245 245 Contents Chapter 15 -- What next? Time to go to work Which community wins Can I see the future? Engage to dominate Abbreviations Bibliography Websites Blogsites Index About the Authors Other books by Tomi Ahonen Other books by futuretext 247 247 249 250 252 255 257 259 263 274

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