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Greener manufacturing operations: from design to delivery and back

Author: Sarkis, Joseph Publisher: Greenleaf Publishing, 2001.Language: EnglishDescription: 387 p. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 187471942XType of document: BookBibliography/Index: Includes bibliographical references and index
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Book Europe Campus
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Print HD75.6 .G74 2001
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001211147
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Includes bibliographical references and index

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Greener Manufacturing and Operations From Design to Delivery and Back Contents Foreword ............................................................................................................... 11 Roger E. Kasperson, Stockholm Environment Institute, Sweden Introduction ........................................................................................................... 15 Joseph Sarkis, Clark University Graduate School of Management, USA PART 1: Operations Strategy and Policy ............................................................. 23 1. Implementing the industrial ecology approach with reverse logistics 24 Michael Martin, University of Exeter, UK 1.1 Levels at which the concept can be applied .................................................................. 26 1.2 The six Is of industrial ecology .......................................................................................... 29 1.3 Reverse logistics principles ............................................................................................... 31 1.4 Types of reverse logistics system ................................................................................... 32 1.5 The five Rs of reverse logistics ......................................................................................... 34 1.6 Final comments .................................................................................................................. 35 2. Life-cycle chain analysis, including recycling ........................................... 36 A.J.D. Lambert, Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, the Netherlands 2.1 Product process chains .................................................................................................. 37 2.2 Discarded complex consumer goods ................................................................................. 45 2.3 Life-cycle assessment (LCA) ............................................................................................... 50 2.4 Conclusions ........................................................................................................................ 55 3. Management of pollution prevention: Integrating environmental technologies in manufacturing ................................................................. 56 Neil Jones, INSEAD, France, and Robert D. Klassen, University of Western Ontario, Canada 3.1 Limits to end-of-pipe environmental technologies ............................................................ 58 3.2 Conceptual framework .......................................................................................................61 3.3 Managing to move beyond end-of-pipe pollution technology .......................................... 65 3.4 Managerial implications and future directions .................................................................. 67 6 GREENER MANUFACTURING AND OPERATIONS 4. Organising environmental investments in small and mediumsized firms: A cost-benefit instrument as a tool for integrating environmental policy into overall business policy .................................... 69 Anja de Groene, Hogeschool Zeeland, University of Professional Education, the Netherlands, and Job de Haan, Tilburg University, the Netherlands 4.1 Cost-benefit analysis ........................................................................................................... 4.2 Environmental management measures .......................................................................... 4.3 Findings ............................................................................................................................... 4.4 Discussion of findings ......................................................................................................... 4.5 Lessons learned ............................................................................................................... 4.6 Conclusions and (managerial) implications ........................................................................ 70 73 75 79 80 81 5. Green issues in product development ........................................................... 83 Johan Sandström, Umed University, Sweden 5.1 Driving forces, action and beliefs ....................................................................................... 83 5.2 Grass roots and technocrats ........................................................................................... 84 5.3 Husqvarna ......................................................................................................................... 84 5.4 Duni ..................................................................................................................................... 87 5.5 Legislation, rhetoric and incrementalism ............................................................................ 89 6. Corporate environmental reporting: Value for manufacturing operations ............................................................91 Harry Fatkin, Fatkin Consultancy, USA 6.1 What is environmental reporting? .................................................................................... 92 6.2 Reporting and manufacturing operations ........................................................................ 93 6.3 Report pioneering: the Polaroid case .............................................................................. 95 6.4 Environmental reporting evolution ..................................................................................... 99 6.5 Environmental reporting's future ...................................................................................... 100 6.6 Conclusions ....................................................................................................................... 103 PART 2: Manufacturing and Operations Practice .................................... 105 7. Industrial hazardous waste minimisation: Barriers and opportunities ........................................................................ 106 Mark Atlas, North Carolina State University, USA 7.1 Biennial Reporting System data ....................................................................................... 7.2 General waste minimisation trends................................................................................. 7.3 Waste minimisation actions .............................................................................................. 7.4 Waste reduction quantities ........................................................................................... 7.5 Conclusions ....................................................................................................................... 107 109 113 115 120 8. Sustainable manufacturing in Lebanon ....................................................... 121 Toufic Mezher, American University of Beirut, USA 8.1 The concept of best practice ......................................................................................... 8.2 Compiling records of best practice ................................................................................... 8.3 The state of the environment of Lebanon ..................................................................... 8.4 Methodology and scope of the study ............................................................................ 8.5 Results and interpretation of results ............................................................................. 8.6 The role of the technology triangle in the sustainability of industry ............................. 8.7 Conclusions ....................................................................................................................... 122 123 123 124 125 132 134 CONTENTS 9. Customers as green suppliers: Managing the complexity of the reverse supply chain ........................... 136 Stephan Vachon, Robert D. Klassen and P. Fraser Johnson, Richard Ivey School of Business, University of Western Ontario, Canada 9.1 Reverse supply chain ........................................................................................................ 9.2 Supply chain complexity .................................................................................................. 9.3 Managing reverse supply chain complexity: implications for environmental performance ................................................................ 9.4 Conclusions ....................................................................................................................... 137 140 143 148 10. A framework for green supply chain costing: A fashion industry example ....................................................................... 150 Stefan A. Seuring, Carl-von-Ossietzky Universität Oldenburg, Germany 10.1 Supply chain management .......................................................................................... 150 10.2 Cost management and supply chain costing ............................................................... 153 10.3 Analysing cost drivers in the supply chain of the fashion industry ................................ 155 10.4 Optimising costs in the supply chain of the fashion industry ...................................... 157 10.5 Conclusions ..................................................................................................................... 160 11. Design for energy efficiency and selection .............................................. 163. Marc A. Rosen, Ryerson Polytechnic University, Canada 11.1 Energy and conversion technologies .............................................................................. 11.2 Impact of energy use on the environment.................................................................. 11.3 Design for energy efficiency .......................................................................................... 11.4 Design for energy selection ............................................................................................ 11.5 Limitations on increased energy efficiency .................................................................... 11.6 Case study: reducing environmental impact through co-generation of electricity and heat ......................................................................... 11.7 Closing remarks Appendix: Internet sites ....................................................................................................... 162 162 163 168 169 171 176 12. ISO 14001: Greening management systems............................................... 178 Nicole Darnall, North Carolina State University, USA, and Deborah Rigling Gallagher and Richard N. L. Andrews, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, USA 12.1 ISO 14001 environmental management systems and the National Database for Environmental Management Systems ..................................... 179 12.2 Adopting ISO 14001: three case studies .................................................................... 180 12.3 Internal results of ISO 14001 adoption ...................................................................... 183 12.4 External results of ISO 14001 adoption .......................................................................... 186 12.5 Summary of results ...................................................................................................... 189 12.6 Conclusions ..................................................................................................................... 189 PART 3: Tools for Managing Greener Manufacturing and Operations . 191 13. Environmental management policies: A comparison of reactive and proactive approaches .............................. 192 Karl-Werner Hansmann and Claudia Kroeger, University of Hamburg, Germany 13.1 Environmental strategies .............................................................................................. 193 13.2 Environment-oriented production planning .................................................................... 194 8 GREENER MANUFACTURING AND OPERATIONS 13.3 Numerical example for the reactive production planning model ................................... 196 13.4 The proactive production planning model ...................................................................... 198 13.5 The approach of Schaltegger and Sturm ...................................................................... 199 13.6 Dual prices as weights for pollutants ............................................................................ 201 13.7 Summary .........................................................................................................................203 14. Aggregate planning for end-of-life products............................................. 205 Surendra M. Gupta, Northeastern University, USA, and Pitipong Veerakamolmal, IBM Corporation, USA 14.1 Problem context ............................................................................................................. 205 14.2 an analytical solution ...................................................................................................... 207 14.3 An illustrative example ................................................................................................... 210 14.4 Conclusions ..................................................................................................................... 215 Appendix: notation used in this chapter ................................................................................ 215 15. Assessing life-cycle environmental impact: Methodology to spur design of greener products and processes .... 223 K. Ravi Kumar, University of Southern California, USA, Arvind Malhotra, University of North Carolina, USA, and Dongwon Lee, University of Southern California, USA 15.1 A life-cycle assessment framework ................................................................................224 15.2 A proposed methodology ................................................................................................ 226 15.3 Components of the vector of impact of product on the environment.......................... 230 15.4 Illustrative application .................................................................................................... 236 15.5 Conclusions and future research ................................................................................... 240 Appendix: vector of impact of product on the environment .................................................. 241 16. Tools for closed-loop manufacturing ........................................................ 243 Ad J. de Ron and Frans W. Melissen, Eindhoven University of Technology, the Netherlands 16.1 The product design phase ............................................................................................. 16.2 Optimal life-cycle and design for recovery .................................................................... 16.3 The manufacturing phase .............................................................................................. 16.4 The recovery phase ........................................................................................................ 16.5 Summary and conclusions .............................................................................................. 244 245 248 249 254 17. Recovery strategies and reverse logistics network design .....................256 Harold Krikke, Erasmus University, the Netherlands 17.1 Reverse logistics developments in Europe ..................................................................... 17.2 Research design and methodology ............................................................................... 17.3 Modelling recovery strategies ........................................................................................ 17.4 Modelling logistics network design ................................................................................ 17.5 Main findings .................................................................................................................. 257 258 259 266 271 18. A framework for hierarchical planning and control for remanufacturing .....................................................................................273 V. Daniel R. Guide Jr and David W. Pentico, Duquesne University, USA, and Vaidy Jayaraman, Washington State University, USA 18.1 Research literature ......................................................................................................... 275 18.2 A framework for a closed-loop hierarchical planning model ......................................... 276 18.3 Conclusions and areas for future research ................................................................... 287 CONTENTS PART 4: Case Studies.................................................................................... 289 19. Design for environment at Sony: ` Incorporating a sound respect for nature'................................................ 290 Shane J. Schvaneveldt, Weber State University, USA, and Hidetaka Yanagida and Akira Isobe, Sony Corporation, Japan 19.1 Overview of Sony's environmental initiatives ............................................................... 291 19.2 Creating environmentally conscious products at Sony .................................................. 292 19.3 Emphasis areas for design of environmentally conscious products ............................ 294 19.4 Support tools for design for environment ..................................................................... 297 19.5 Conclusions .................................................................................................................... 301 20. Chevron corporation: Strategic financing for energy efficiency projects ................................... 303 Forrest Briscoe, MIT Sloan School of Management, USA 20.1 Background: project specifications ................................................................................ 304 20.2 Pre-project perspective: energy efficiency at Chevron ................................................. 305 20.3 The project context ....................................................................................................... 307 20.4 The energy efficiency industry....................................................................................... 308 20.5 Project implementation .................................................................................................. 309 20.6 Performance-based financing ........................................................................................ 310 20.7 Conclusions .................................................................................................................... 311 21. A structured approach to industrial emission reduction: The case of a gypsum wallboard production plant .................................. 314 Richard A. Reid, University of New Mexico, USA, Elsa L. Koljonen, Intel Corporation, USA, and J. Bruce Buell, Lafarge Gypsum Corporation, USA 21.1 The Deming Cycle: a structured guide to continuous improvement ........................... 315 21.2 Applying the Deming Cycle to process improvement: a case study ............................. 320 21.3 Some conclusions and managerial implications ............................................................ 328 22. Textile waste-water reduction: A case study ............................................. 331 Charles L. McEntyre, Tennessee Valley Authority, USA 22.1 Example facility .............................................................................................................. 22.2 Holistic assessment methodology .................................................................................. 22.3 Audit results ................................................................................................................... 22.4 Conclusions .................................................................................................................... 332 332 335 337 23. Development and application of a pollution prevention index as a P2 metric in a manufacturing plant ........................................ 339 Eric H. Snider, GeoSyntec Consultants, USA, and Daniel B. Moorhead, Tenneco Automotive, USA 23.1 The logic behind the pollution prevention index ........................................................... 340 23.2 Pollution prevention index: details of use ...................................................................... 344 23.3 Plant-specific use of the pollution prevention index for waste reduction . . . ............. 346 23.4 Continuous improvement: adjusting the goals ............................................................ 346 23.5 Benchmarking pollution prevention indexes among facilities ...................................... 347 23.6 Conclusions .................................................................................................................... 348 10 GREENER MANUFACTURING AND OPERATIONS 24. Assessment of environmental impacts: A case study of an integrated approach at the plant level ..................... 349 Matti Melanen and Kimmo Silvo, Finnish Environment Institute, and Lea Gynther, Electrowatt-Ekono Oy, Finland 24.1 Approach and methodology used .............................................................................. 350 24.2 The UPM-Kymmene Kaukas plant and its environmental impacts ............................. 354 24.3 Discussion and conclusions .......................................................................................... 357 Bibliography ......................................................................................................... 359 List of abbreviations............................................................................................. 370 Author biographies............................................................................................... 373 Index ..................................................................................................................... 379

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