Normal view MARC view

Big in Asia: 30 strategies for business success

Author: Backman, Michael ; Butler, CharlotteINSEAD Area: Asian Business and Comparative ManagementPublisher: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007.Language: EnglishDescription: 438 p. ; 23 cm.ISBN: 0230000274Type of document: INSEAD BookBibliography/Index: Includes indexAbstract: China, India and the rest of Asia is the world's most exciting and dynamic business environment. It is also the most complicated and risky. Can the individual investor or company not just survive but thrive there? This revised and enlarged best-selling guide to doing business in Asia by Michael Backman and Charlotte Butler provides unrivalled practical advice, case studies and examples of how (and how not) to make it big in Asia. The new edition has been comprehensively updated to reflect new realities in the region. It includes chapters on understanding Asia's overseas Chinese and Indian families, how to negotiate and manage partnerships with SE Asian, Japanese and Korean firms, and the best way to avoid post-acquisition trauma, as well as dealing with intellectual property risks, ethical traps and the pitfalls of doing business with Asia's politicians. Five completely new chapters reflect the most pressing issues currently affecting foreign firms. For those confronted by the 'China or India' conundrum, the authors compare the merits and challenges of doing business in both countries, contrasting their respective infrastructure, financial capitals, judiciaries, levels of state intervention, regulatory environments and market conditions. Companies that go to low-cost countries expecting to find cheap, abundant labour will find the actual situation, especially in China, far different, as the authors describe. A chapter on 'Localizing the Labour Force' explains the realities of recruitment in Asia, and what foreign firms can do to bridge the gaps in quantity and quality of local workers and managers. In 'Outsourcing: Where and Why? the authors argue that India, currently the major beneficiary of the worldwide trend in outsourcing, is no longer the only option. In Asia, China, the Philippines and Malaysia are serious contenders, with Russia and the other Eastern European countries and Brazil also making their bids. The authors discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the various candidates, and caution that before making an outsourcing decision, issues like data security and the dangers of a consumer backlash must be carefully considered. They offer additional advice on 'Building a Profile in Asia', citing Starbucks' phenomenal success in Asia as a branding blueprint, as well as the less happy experiences of Disney and De Beers, who took some time to get in step with Asian consumers. The challenges involved in advertising, sponsorship, local branding and anticipating consumer behaviour are all examined. While European and US companies agonise over glass ceilings, Asian women get on with running their own business empires and filling senior management positions. A new chapter on 'Women in Asia: Beyond the Stereotype' explains how they have come to prominence, profiles a number of key businesswomen, and charts the uneven progress of women in China. The new edition dispenses its advice in a format that is easy to read and retain. Each of the 30 strategies begins with a 'what's in this chapter' outline and closes with a summary of key lessons, things to consider, or 'what you need to know'
Tags: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
INSEAD Book Asia Campus
INSEAD Publications Display
Print HC500.4 .B33 2007
(Browse shelf)
900175074
Available 900175074
INSEAD Book Europe Campus
Main Collection
Print HC500.4 .B33 2007
(Browse shelf)
001192305
Available 001192305
INSEAD Book Europe Campus
Main Collection
Print HC500.4 .B33 2007
(Browse shelf)
001224520
Available 001224520
INSEAD Book Middle East Campus
INSEAD Publications Display
Print HC500.4 .B33 2007
(Browse shelf)
500001309
Available 500001309
Total holds: 0

Includes index

China, India and the rest of Asia is the world's most exciting and dynamic business environment. It is also the most complicated and risky. Can the individual investor or company not just survive but thrive there? This revised and enlarged best-selling guide to doing business in Asia by Michael Backman and Charlotte Butler provides unrivalled practical advice, case studies and examples of how (and how not) to make it big in Asia.
The new edition has been comprehensively updated to reflect new realities in the region. It includes chapters on understanding Asia's overseas Chinese and Indian families, how to negotiate and manage partnerships with SE Asian, Japanese and Korean firms, and the best way to avoid post-acquisition trauma, as well as dealing with intellectual property risks, ethical traps and the pitfalls of doing business with Asia's politicians.
Five completely new chapters reflect the most pressing issues currently affecting foreign firms. For those confronted by the 'China or India' conundrum, the authors compare the merits and challenges of doing business in both countries, contrasting their respective infrastructure, financial capitals, judiciaries, levels of state intervention, regulatory environments and market conditions.
Companies that go to low-cost countries expecting to find cheap, abundant labour will find the actual situation, especially in China, far different, as the authors describe. A chapter on 'Localizing the Labour Force' explains the realities of recruitment in Asia, and what foreign firms can do to bridge the gaps in quantity and quality of local workers and managers.
In 'Outsourcing: Where and Why? the authors argue that India, currently the major beneficiary of the worldwide trend in outsourcing, is no longer the only option. In Asia, China, the Philippines and Malaysia are serious contenders, with Russia and the other Eastern European countries and Brazil also making their bids. The authors discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the various candidates, and caution that before making an outsourcing decision, issues like data security and the dangers of a consumer backlash must be carefully considered.
They offer additional advice on 'Building a Profile in Asia', citing Starbucks' phenomenal success in Asia as a branding blueprint, as well as the less happy experiences of Disney and De Beers, who took some time to get in step with Asian consumers. The challenges involved in advertising, sponsorship, local branding and anticipating consumer behaviour are all examined.
While European and US companies agonise over glass ceilings, Asian women get on with running their own business empires and filling senior management positions. A new chapter on 'Women in Asia: Beyond the Stereotype' explains how they have come to prominence, profiles a number of key businesswomen, and charts the uneven progress of women in China.
The new edition dispenses its advice in a format that is easy to read and retain. Each of the 30 strategies begins with a 'what's in this chapter' outline and closes with a summary of key lessons, things to consider, or 'what you need to know'

Digitized

30 Strategies for Business Success Contents List of Figures and Tables Preface vii viii BIG in Asia Part I Hit the Ground Running Strategy 1 Strategy 2 Ignorance is not Bliss Know the Firm, Know the Family: Dealing with Asian Family Firms 1 I5 25 40 52 69 Strategy 3 Strategy 4 Strategy 5 Strategy 6 Women in Asia: Beyond the Stereotype Understand Asia's Overseas Chinese Understand Asia's Overseas Indians Dealing with Information Ambiguity, Local Consultants and Accounting Firms Part II On the Ground Strategy 7 Network like a Local, Negotiate like a Westerner the MandA Route? Managing Partnerships with Southeast Asian Firms Managing Partnerships with Japanese and South Korean Firms China or India? Avoid Post-acquisition Trauma 80 94 108 122 143 160 Strategy 8 Taking Strategy 9 Strategy 10 Strategy 11 Strategy 12 vi Part III Strategy 13 Strategy 14 Strategy 15 Strategy 16 Strategy 17 Strategy 18 Contents Building Up Send the Right People Cross the Cultural Divide Localizing the Labor Force Managing Change Outsourcing: Where and Why? Selling Consulting Services in Asia 173 186 196 211 225 238 Part IV Strategy 19 Strategy 20 Strategy 21 Strategy 22 Strategy 23 Strategy 24 Staying Up Tilt the Playing Field Think Global, Act Local -- But How Far? Building a Profile in Asia Caveat Emptor: Beware the Banks of Asia Avoid Blood Loss as a Minority Shareholder China! The Frenzy Continues 250 265 279 293 303 315 Part V Strategy 25 Staying Clean Negotiate the Law in Asia: Bankruptcy, Contracts and Defamation Intellectual Property Abuse: Contain the Risks Ethical Traps on the Road to Being Big in Asia Corruption:The Business Practice that Dare Not Speak its Name Dancing with the Devil: Doing Business with Asia's Politicians and their Families When Things Go Wrong 339 348 363 Strategy 26 Strategy 27 Strategy 28 376 390 396 411 413 415 Strategy 29 Strategy 30 Acknowledgements Abbreviations Index

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.
Koha 18.11 - INSEAD Catalogue
Home | Contact Us | What's Koha?