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Building supply chain excellence in emerging economies

Author: Lee, Hau L. ; Lee, Chung-Yee Series: International series in operations research and management science Publisher: Springer, 2007.Language: EnglishDescription: 465 p. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0387384286Type of document: BookBibliography/Index: Includes bibliographical references and index
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Book Europe Campus
Main Collection
Print TS155.2 .B84 2007
(Browse shelf)
001210735
Available 001210735
Total holds: 0

Includes bibliographical references and index

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Building Supply Chain Excellence in Emerging Economies Contents Preface Part I Global Supply Chain: General Strategies and Framework Chapter 1 xiii On the Globalization of Operations and Supply Chain Strategies: A Conceptual Framework and Its Application Panes Kouvelis and Julie Niederhoff 1.1. Introduction 1.2. The Driving Forces of the Globalization Process 1.3. Global Market Forces 1.4. Technological Forces 1.5. Global Cost Forces 1.6. Political and Macroeconomical Forces 1.7. Applying the Framework: The Acrilan Case 1.8. Summary References Chapter 2 Globalization and Emerging Markets: The Challenge of Continuous Global Network Optimization Peter Koudal and Douglas A. Engel 2.1. The Optimization Paradox 2.2. Why Are Companies Falling Behind in Optimizing Their Global Networks? 2.3. Profiting from Continuous Network Optimization 2.4. Conclusion Appendix: Defining Complexity Masters 37 38 41 46 64 64 3 3 5 7 11 15 20 24 34 36 Chapter 3 Shanghai or Charlotte? The Decision to Outsource to China and Other Low Cost Countries David F Pvke 3.1. Introduction 3.2. The Four Companies 3.3. A Framework for the Decision Process 3.4. Corporate Strategy Review 3.5. Operations Strategy Review 3.6. Total Landed Cost 3.7. Risk 85 3.8. Domestic Sourcing 3.9. Summary and Conclusions References Chapter 4 Life-Saving Supply Chains: Challenges and the Path Forward Anisya Thomas and Laura Rock Kopczak 4.1. Introduction 4.2. The Scope, Importance and Challenge of Humanitarian Logistics 4.3. The Humanitarian Sector Ecosystem 4.4. The Path Forward 4.5. Conclusion: Learning as the Basis for Strategic Contribution 4.6. Appendix: Resources and Direction for the Academic Community References Chapter 5 Dual Sourcing Strategies: Operational Hedging and Outsourcing to Reducing Risk in Low-Cost Countries M. Eric Johnson 5.1. Introduction 5.2. Company Background 5.3. Miniature Car Market 5.4. Die-Cast Manufacturing 5.5. Outsourcing Strategy ­ Vendor Operations Asia 5.6. Production Options 5.7. Lessons from Mattel 113 113 114 117 120 123 125 130 108 110 95 96 102 108 93 93 88 89 92 67 67 68 71 73 78 83 Part II Supply Chain Management in Emerging Economies: Challenges and Opportunities Chapter 6 Managing Supply Chain Operations in India: Pitfalls and Opportunities Jayashankar M. Swaminathan 6.1. Introduction 6.2. India: Source and Market 6.3. Supply Chain Management in India 6.4. Concluding Remarks Acknowledgements References Chapter 7 Integrated Fulfillment in Today's China Jamie M. Bolton and Wenbo Liu 7.1. WTO Entry: Integrated Fulfillment 7.2. Side Bar 7.3. Recommendations for Foreign Companies 7.4. China's Logistics Rules Obscure the Way Forward 7.5. Proceed with Caution, but Do Proceed References Chapter 8 Logistics Management in China: Challenges, Opportunities and Strategies Gengzhong Feng, Gang Yu and Wei Jiang 8.1. Preface 8.2. Overview of Logistics Market in China 8.3. Obstacles and Challenges 8.4. Opportunities and Tactics 8.5. Conclusions References Chapter 9 Connectivity at Inter-modal Hub Cities: The Case of Hong Kong Raymond K. Cheung and Allen W. Lee 9.1. Introduction 9.2. Logistics Development in PRD 9.3. Challenges on Connectivity and New Operating Models 9.4. Managing Freight Flow at Relay Centers 9.5. Looking Ahead 201 201 203 206 213 220 177 177 179 183 191 197 199 155 156 156 166 172 174 175 137 137 138 142 151 153 154 Acknowledgement References Chapter 10 Service Parts Management in China Steven Aschkenase and Keith Nash 10.1. Introduction 10.2. Why Worry About Service Parts? 10.3. What Makes the Service Parts Business Different? 10.4. Service Parts in Emerging Markets 10.5. Why Emerging Markets Are Less Willing to Pay a Premium for Genuine OEM Parts 10.6. Why Foreign OEMs Have a Hard Time Competing on Price 10.7. Logistics Problems Add to the Challenge 10.8. The Profit Challenge 10.9. Improving the Business 10.10. Getting Your Service Parts Supply Chain into Fighting Trim Chapter 11 DHL in China: The Role of Logistics Governance Kelvin Leung and Paul Forster 11.1. Introduction 11.2. What is Logistics Governance? 11.3. Why Logistics Governance Matters 11.4. DHL in China 11.5. National Logistics Governance 11.6. Economic Zones 11.7. Pan Pearl River Delta Economic Zone 11.8. Logistics Parks 11.9. Bonded Facilities 11.10. Zone-Port Interaction Area (Free Port) 11.11. The Issue of Licenses 11.12. Conclusions References Part III Building Supply Chain Excellence: Innovations and Success Cases Chapter 12 Supply Chain Reengineering in Agri-Business: A Case Study of ITC's e-Choupal Ravi Anupindi and S. Sivakumar 220 221 223 223 224 225 228 229 231 232 234 234 239 241 241 244 244 246 248 252 253 255 255 256 257 259 262 265 12.1. Introduction 12.2. Procurement Efficiency in the Soy-Supply Chain 12.3. Variety-based Strategies in the Wheat Supply Chain 12.4. Re-engineered Supply Chains for Commodity Services: The Story of Coffee 12.5. Summary and Conclusion References Chapter 13 Esquel Group: Going Beyond the Traditional Approach in the Apparel Industry Barchi Peleg-Gillai 13.1. Introduction 13.2. Esquel Group ­ Company Background 13.3. Strive for Quality and the Transition to Vertical Integration 13.4. Value Proposition to Customers 13.5. Internal Operations Management 13.6. E-Culture 13.7. Corporate Social Responsibility 13.8. Taking Care of Employees 13.9. Future Perspective References Chapter 14 End-To-End Transformation in the CEMEX Supply Chain David Hoyt and Hau L. Lee 14.1. Introduction 14.2. The Cement Supply Chain 14.3. CEMEX's Corporate History 14.4. The Roots of Culture and Technology Innovation at CEMEX 14.5. The CEMEX Supply Chain in Mexico 14.6. End-To-End Supply Chain Transformation 14.7. Supply Chain Integration with Information Technology 14.8. Results and Lessons from Transformation Chapter 15 The IDS Story: Reinventing Distribution Through Value-Chain Logistics Ben Chang and Joseph Phi 15.1. The Li and Fung Story of Export Trading 15.2. The Emergence of IDS Group in Asian Import Distribution 15.3. The Challenge of Traditional Distribution 266 273 285 291 302 307 309 310 312 314 325 327 332 337 339 340 343 345 345 347 349 350 352 354 357 364 367 368 369 370 15.4. The IDS Approach ­ Value-Chain Logistics 15.5. IDS ­ A Regional Powerhouse 15.6. Business Transformation ­ Change Management and a New Culture 15.7. Three-Year Strategic Plan 15.8. IDS ­ New Business Model 15.9. The Future ­ Poised for Growth 15.10. The Journey Continues Chapter 16 Building a Sustainable Supply Chain: Starbucks' Coffee and Farm Equity Program Hau L. Lee, Stacy Duda, LaShawn James, Zervn Mackwani, Raul Munoz and David Volk 16.1. Sustainable Supply Chain 16.2. The Starbucks Corporation 16.3. The Specialty Coffee Industry and the Starbucks Coffee Supply Chain 16.4. C.A.F.E. Practices 16.5. Success Story of a Coffee Farmer ­ Investment Payoff for CAFE Standards 16.6. Benefits to Starbucks 16.7. Corporate Social Responsibility 16.8. C.A.F.E. Practices Implementation 16.9. Concluding Remarks Chapter 17 Building a Distribution System in Eastern Europe: Organic Growth in the Czech Republic M. Eric Johnson 17.1. Introduction 17.2. Early Company History 17.3. Papirius' Strategy 17.4. Superstores Expand Globally 17.5. A Lurking Threat 17.6. Update and Learnings Chapter 18 A Path to Low Cost Manufacturing for Integrated Global Supply Chain Solutions Wesley Chen 18.1. Background 373 375 379 381 384 386 389 391 392 392 394 396 399 400 402 403 404 407 407 408 411 417 420 421 427 427 18.2. Why Manufacture Electronics in China? 18.3. Cost Advantage 18.4. You Can't Afford Not To Be in China 18.5. Challenges 18.6. Solectron China Experience 18.7. Proximity to Local Supply Chain 18.8. Government Support and Cooperation 18.9. Six Sigma Lean Manufacturing 18.10. Solectron Has Advantages in Logistics in China 18.11. Design for China Supply Chain 18.12. Conclusion Chapter 19 Transforming an Indian Manufacturing Company: The Rane Brake Linings Case Ananth V Iyer and Sridhar Seshadri 19.1. Trade Liberalization and its Impact in India 19.2. What Does It Take To Be a Global Supplier? 19.3. RBL Before the Transformation 19.4. New Goals 19.5. History 19.6. The Japanese Professors at RBL 19.7. Executing TQM at RBL 19.8. Materials Management at RBL 19.9. Customer and Supplier Coordination to Improve Product Specification and Performance 19.10. How Has RBL Evolved as a Result of Its Deming Journey? 19.11. Discussion 19.12. Conclusions References Index 428 429 430 431 432 433 434 435 436 438 438 441 441 442 443 444 445 446 447 448 449 450 451 454 455 457

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