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Fleet forum: rethinking humanitarian vehicle management

Author: Van Wassenhove, Luk N. INSEAD Area: Technology and Operations ManagementPublisher: Fontainebleau : INSEAD, 2006.Language: EnglishDescription: 23 p.Type of document: INSEAD CaseNote: Latest version available via https://publishing.insead.eduAbstract: Fleet Management is the second largest spending in the humanitarian sector, preceded by staffing. Aware of the fact and concerned for the increased need for efficiency, a group of humanitarian professionals manage to raise awareness in their community and bring to the discussion table the members of the different organizations concerned. The turnout is unexpected, the willingness to improve is high, yet the challenge remains how to bring about change in a sector that is so fragemented, without control or command, and where fleet management has long been viewed as the job of those people "with grease under their nails". Pedagogical Objectives: The case study can be used to discuss the complexity of the humanitarian environment and the need for greater coordination and efficiency. Its also serves to discuss the potential role of the private sector and the need to exchange best practices.
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Latest version available via <a href=https://publishing.insead.edu>https://publishing.insead.edu</a>

The case study can be used to discuss the complexity of the humanitarian environment and the need for greater coordination and efficiency. Its also serves to discuss the potential role of the private sector and the need to exchange best practices.

Fleet Management is the second largest spending in the humanitarian sector, preceded by staffing. Aware of the fact and concerned for the increased need for efficiency, a group of humanitarian professionals manage to raise awareness in their community and bring to the discussion table the members of the different organizations concerned. The turnout is unexpected, the willingness to improve is high, yet the challenge remains how to bring about change in a sector that is so fragemented, without control or command, and where fleet management has long been viewed as the job of those people "with grease under their nails".

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