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Semiotics unbounded: interpretive routes through the open network of signs

Author: Petrilli, Susan ; Ponzio, AugustoPublisher: University of Toronto Press 2005.Language: EnglishDescription: 630 p. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0802087655Type of document: BookBibliography/Index: Includes bibliographical references and index
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Book Europe Campus
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Print P99 .P48 2005
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001176886
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Includes bibliographical references and index

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Semiotics Unbounded Interpretive Routes through the Open Network of Signs Contents Preface Introduction: An Excursion into Semiotics I.1 Two Meanings of Semiotics I.2. Protagonist: The Sign I.3. Stooge: The Interpretant I.4. Pragmatism as Pragmaticism I.5. The Verbal Sign's Influence on Semiotics I.6. Signification and Significance I.7. Signification and Denotatum I.8. Beyond the Verbal Sign Paradigm I.9. Subject and Alterity I.10. Word and Dialogue I.11. Dialogue and Inference I.12. Inferences and Categories: Semiotics, Logic, Ontology xvii 3 3 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 19 22 25 28 PART ONE: SEMIOTICS AND SEMIOTICIANS 1 An Itinerary: From Peirce to Others 1.1. Problems on Peirce's Desk 1.1.1. Semiosis, Interpretation, and the Quasi-Interpreter 1.1.2. Sign Displacement, Identity, and Otherness 1.1.3. Knowledge in the Gnoseological Sense, but also as Responsible Awareness 1.1.4. Interpretation and Representation 1.1.5. The General Character of Peirce's Sign Model 33 35 35 35 38 40 41 45 viii Contents 1.2. More Problems in Focus: Subjects, Bodies, and Signs 1.2.1. The Dialogic Self 1.2.2. Personal Identity and the Doctrine of Synechism 1.2.3. Consciousness, Body, World 1.2.4. Private Worlds and Public Worlds 1.2.5. Habit and the Play of Musement 1.3. Neglected but Foundational Aspects of Peirce's Semiotics 1.3.1. Three Evolutionary Modes in the Cosmos . 1.3.2. Axiological Problems as Semiotic Problems 1.3.3. Love and Logic 1.3.4. Agapic Comprehension and Welby's Mother-Sense 1.3.5. Looking from Peirce's Perspective Biographical Note 2 About Welby 2.1. Why `Significs'? A Contribution to Theory of Meaning, and More 2.1.1. A Lady Significian 2.1.2. Three Levels of Meaning 2.1.3. Significance, Translation, Interpretation 2.1.4. A Method in Mental Exercise 2.1.5. Critique of `Plain Meaning' 2.2. Departure: Exegesis and Holy Scripture 2.2.1. The Problem of Meaning and Interpretation of the Holy Scriptures 2.2.2. For a Dialogue between Religion and Science, a Question of Method 2.2.3. Light, Love, and Progress in Knowledge 2.2.4. From Exegesis to the Translative Method 2.3. Reading Significs as `Biosensifics' 2.3.1. Sense and Its Organic Basis 2.3.2. The Plasticity of Language and Evolutionary Development of Consciousness 2.3.3. Signs and Evolution of Life: A Research Program 2.3.4. Organism and Environment in Cultural Evolution 2.3.5. The Biological Basis of Signifying Processes Biographical Note 3 About Bakhtin 3.1. Philosophy of Language as Critique of Dialogic Reason 47 47 50 52 57 58 59 60 62 64 70 74 79 80 80 81 83 87 88 90 90 91 92 95 99 102 102 105 109 118 123 134 138 138 Contents ix 3.1.1. Philosophy of Literature and Philosophy of Language 3.1.2. Semiotics and Philosophy of Language 3.1.3. Bakhtin's Sign Model 3.1.4. Bakhtinian Dialogue 3.1.5. Bakhtinian Dialogism and Biosemiotics 3.1.6. For a Critique of Dialogic Reason 3.2. An Interdisciplinary Perspective and Detotalizing Method 3.2.1. From the Boundaries of Art Criticism 3.2.2. Signs and Signals 3.2.3. On Ideology 3.2.4. The Unconscious and Ideology 3.2.5. The Question of Values 3.2.6. A Dialogic Method Biographical Note 4 About Morris 4.1. Behaviouristic Semiotics and Pragmaticist Semiotics 4.1.1. Sidelights 4.1.2. Morris and Peirce 4.1.3. Returning to Peirce 4.1.4. From Scientific Empiricism Onward 4.1.5. Morris's Behaviouristics 4.2. Semiotics and Biology 4.2.1. Criteria, not Definitions 4.2.2. Biological Terminology to Talk about Signs 4.2.3. Biology and Symbolism at the Origin of Morris's Research 4.2.4. Behaviour Involving Symbols 4.2.5. General Linguistic Symbols and Verbal Linguistic Symbols 4.3. Sign, Dimensions of Semiosis, Denotatum, and Language 4.3.1. The Most Recalcitrant Term: Sign 4.3.2. Misunderstandings over the Dimensions of Semiosis 4.3.3. Designatum and Denotatum 4.3.4. Language and General Linguistics 4.3.5. Human and Non-Human Signs Biographical Notes 5 About Sebeok 5.1. Modelling Systems Theory and Global Semiotics 138 140 141 144 148 151 153 154 157 158 159 162 165 166 167 167 167 169 171 172 173 176 176 179 181 182 184 186 186 191 193 195 200 201 203 203 x Contents 5.1.1. Semiosic Phenomena as Modelling Processes 5.1.2. Critique of the Pars Pro Toto Error 5.1.3. Semiosic Boundaries 5.1.4. Sebeok's Semiosic Universe 5.1.5. Global Semiotics 5.2. Semiotics and Semiosis 5.2.1. Three Aspects of the Unifying Function of Semiotics 5.2.2. Semiosis and Semiotics: `Semiotics,' Another Meaning 5.2.3. To Live and to Lie 5.2.4. Origin of Language and Speech 5.2.5. Iconicity and Language 5.3. Sebeok's Works and the Destiny of Semiosis 5.3.1. A Tetralogy 5.3.2. Semiotics as a Doctrine of Signs and Metasemiosis 5.3.3. From the Non-Human Interpreter Sign to the Human Interpreter Verb 5.3.4. European and American Semiotics: A Dialogue 5.3.5. The Destiny of Semiosis after Life 5.4. Sebeok's Semiotics and Education 5.4.1. The Role of Signs in the Educational Process 5.4.2. Implications of Sebeok's Work for Education 5.4.3. Education to Mutual Adjustment of Language and Speech 226 5.4.4. Semiotics and Foresight of `Proximal Development' 5.4.5. Global Semiotics and Education to Responsibility for Life Biographical Notes 203 205 206 208 209 211 211 213 214 215 216 218 218 219 220 221 222 223 223 224 227 229 230 232 233 233 235 241 245 248 250 251 6 About Rossi-Landi 6.1. Rossi-Landi's Philosophy of Language 6.1.1. His Semiotic Studies 6.1.2. Common Speech Theory 6.1.3. Language as the A Priori 6.1.4. Language as Work and Trade 6.1.5. Language as a Human Prerogative 6.1.6. Linguistic Work and Linguistic Use 6.1.7. On the Homology between Verbal and Non-Verbal Human Communication Contents xi 6.1.8. Ideology and Linguistic Alienation 6.1.9. Social Reproduction 6.2. On the Tracks of a Multiform Research Itinerary 6.2.1. From Common Speech to Common Semiosis 6.2.2. For a `Homological Method' 6.2.3. Morris in Rossi-Landi's Interpretation 6.2.4. The Correspondence between Morris and Rossi-Landi 6.2.5. On Sign and Non-Sign Materiality 6.3. Communication, Mass Media, and Critique of Ideology 6.3.1. The Homination Process in Relation to Linguistic and Non-Linguistic Production 6.3.2. For a Critique of Linguistic and Ideological Alienation in a Semiotical Key 6.3.3. Social Planning and Multimedial Communication 6.3.4. Cultural Capital and Social Alienation 6.3.5. The Role of Signs in Neocapitalist Society 6.4. Rossi-Landi between Ideologie and `Scienze Umane' 6.4.1. Doctrine of Ideologies and Semiotics of Social Communication Programs 6.4.2. The Pars Pro Toto Fallacy 6.4.3. Ideology and False Consciousness 6.4.4. Semiotics and Critique of the Humanities 6.4.5. Research and Disalienating Praxis 6.4.6. The New Concept of Work in Neocapitalist Society 6.4.7. Further Developments in Rossi-Landi's Meditations on Ideology Biographical Note 7 About Eco 7.1. From Decodification to Interpretation 7.1.1. Eco's Contribution to the Transition from Decodification Semiotics to Interpretation Semiotics in Italy 7.1.2. Peirce in Italy 7.1.3. Aporias in the Effort to Solve the Opposition between Communication and Signification 7.1.4. Meaning and Referent: Aporias in the Effort to Solve the Opposition between Referentialism and Non-Referentialism in Semiotics 254 255 256 256 259 260 264 268 269 269 271 276 279 281 283 283 286 288 291 292 294 295 297 298 299 299 304 310 314 xii Contents 7.1.5. Sign Production and Ideology 7.1.6. Extending the Boundaries of Semiotics 7.2. Interpretation and Responsive Understanding 7.2.1. On Sign Models between Semiotics and Philosophy of Language 7.2.2. Interpretation and Dialogism in the Study of Signs Biographical Note 320 322 324 324 329 340 PART TWO: MODELLING, WRITING, AND OTHERNESS 8 Modelling and Otherness 8.1. Modelling, Communication, and Dialogism 8.1.1. Model and Modelling 8.1.2. Reformulating Thure von Uexkûll's Typology of Semiosis 8.1.3. From `Substitution' to `Interpretation' 8.1.4. Centrality of the Interpretant in the `Semiosic Matrix' 8.1.5. The Dialogic Nature of Sign and Semiosis 8.1.6. Dialogue and the `Functional Cycle' 8.1.7. Dialogism and Biosemiosis 8.1.8. The Biological Basis of Bakhtinian Dialogue and the `Great Experience' 8.1.9. Rabelais's World as the World's Biosemiotic Consciousness 8.2. Identity, Otherness, and Primal Sense as a Modelling Device 8.2.1. Primal Sense or Mother-Sense 8.2.2. Primal Sense, Modelling, and Creativity 8.2.3. Primal Sense, Otherness, and Criticism 8.2.4. Identity, Primal Sense, and the Logic of Love 8.2.5. 'Idem' as Otherness, Intercorporeity, and Dialogism 8.3. Writing as a Modelling Device 8.3.1. Writing and Transcription 8.3.2. Writing and Language 8.3.3. Literary Writing and the Creativity of Language 9 Writing and Dialogue 9.1. Dialogue, Otherness, and Writing 9.1.1. Dialogue 341 343 343 343 344 345 347 349 350 352 353 354 356 356 358 364 366 369 372 372 374 375 377 377 377 Contents xiii 9.1.2. Otherness, Dialogue, Intercorporeity 9.1.3. Dialogism, Otherness, and Signs 9.1.4. Writing 9.1.5. Orality, Writing, and Otherness 9.2. Dialogue and Carnivalized Writing 9.2.1. Different Degrees of Dialogism 9.2.2. The `Time of Festivity' and the `Great Time' of Writing 9.2.3. The Carnivalesque in Writing 9.2.4. Writing in the Bakhtinian Perspective 9.3. Dialogue and Polyphony in the Writing of Novels and Drama 9.3.1. Representation and Depiction 9.3.2. The Author's Word and Polyphony in the Novel 9.3.3. Dialogue and the Body 9.3.4. Dramatization and Polyphony in the Word of Novel and Drama 9.4. Storytelling in the Era of Global Communication: Black Writing - Oraliture 9.4.1. Two Different Types of Communication 9.4.2. `Oraliture' and Writing 9.4.3. Texts That Are Distant From Each Other 9.4.4. Brer Rabbit Stories 9.4.5. The Novel and the Genres of African Oral Literature Biographical Note 380 384 388 390 396 396 397 398 399 400 400 403 406 411 415 415 417 418 421 424 428 PART THREE: PREDICATIVE JUDGMENT, ARGUMENTATION, AND COMMUNICATION 429 10 Understanding and Misunderstanding 10.1. Semiogenealogy of Predicative Judgment 10.1.1. Semiotics as Constitutive Phenomenology 10.1.2. Four Different Aspects of the Phenomenology of the Object 10.1.3. Semiotics as Transcendental Logic: The Question of the Ground 10.1.4. Similarity, the Ground, and the Immediate Object 431 431 431 434 437 440 xiv Contents 10.1.5. Similarity and the Image 10.1.6. Genesis of Predicative Judgment 10.1.7. Metalinguistics and the Precategorial Level 10.1.8. The `I-do' 10.1.9. `As if and Predication as Acting 10.2. Objective Misunderstanding and Mystifications of Language 10.2.1. The `Maladies of Language' 10.2.2. Ambiguity, `Precision,' and the `Panacea of Definition' 10.2.3. Equivocation and Figurative Language 10.2.4. The Fallacy of Invariable `Plain, Obvious, Common Sense Meaning' 10.2.5. The Fallacy of `Universal Language': Common Speech 10.2.6. Critical Commonsensism and Pragmaticism 10.2.7. Generality and Vagueness 11 Closed Community and Open Community in Global Communication 11.1. Logic, Argumentation and Dialogue in Global Communication 11.1.1. Critique of the Reason of Global Communication 11.1.2. Dialogue, Theory of Semiosis, and Theory of Argumentation 11.1.3. Signs of Rhetorical Tricks 11.1.4. For a Critique of Television Communication in a Semiotical Key 11.1.5. Dialogue and Lying 11.1.6. Television and Keeping a Good Conscience 11.2. Argumentative Logic at the Helsinki Conference and Communication--Production Ideology 11.2.1. Communication--Production and War 11.2.2. A Semiotic Analysis of the Helsinki Final Act 11.2.3. Argumentative Loci and Weak Points in the Helsinki Final Act 11.2.4. `Nation' as Identity and as Difference 11.2.5. Mutual Recognition Based on Convention and Assimilating the Other 442 445 449 451 455 458 458 459 463 466 469 471 473 478 478 478 480 484 486 489 490 491 491 494 494 496 498 Contents xv 11.2.6. A Third Way of Understanding the Relations among Nation-States 11.3. The Sign Machine: Linguistic Work and Global Communication 11.3.1. Semiosis, Communication, and Machines 11.3.2. A Machine Capable of Semiotics 11.3.3. Human-Machine Interactivity 11.3.4. Human Intelligence as a Resource 11.3.5. The Intelligent Machine, Linguistic Work, and the Work Market 11.3.6. Language, Modelling, Alterity, and the Open Community 11.4. Otherness and Communication: From the Closed Community to the Open Community 11.4.1. A Narrow Concept of Communication 11.4.2. Being and Communication 11.4.3. Persistence in Communication--Production as Persistence in the Same Social System 11.4.4. Ontology of Communication--Being 11.4.5. Communication and Language 11.4.6. The Communication--Ontology Relation in Today's Global Communication--Production System 11.4.7. Beyond the Being of Communication 11.4.8. Sociality as Closed Community and Indifferent Labour 11.4.9. Communion, or Sociality Regulated by Otherness Biographical Notes 12 Global Communication, Biosemiotics, and Semioethics 12.1. Semioethics, Community, and Otherness 12.1.1. Global Communication and Global Semiotics 12.1.2. Responsibility and Semioethics 12.1.3. Identity and Alterity: On Subjectivity and Reasonableness 12.1.4. Signs of Humanity and Humanity of Signs 12.1.5. Semiotics as an Attitude and the Critical Work of Semioethics 12.2. Bioethics, Semiotics of Life, and Global Communication 499 502 503 505 507 508 511 515 517 517 518 520 521 523 525 527 528 531 533 535 535 536 538 540 545 549 550 xvi Contents 12.2.1. Bioethics and Global Semiotics 12.2.2. Being and Sign: A Foundational and Critical Approach to Bioethics 12.2.3. Bioethics and Global Communication Glossary Bibliography Index 550 552 554 559 565 613

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