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The Discovery of India

Author: Nehru, Jawaharlal Publisher: Meridian, 1960.Language: EnglishDescription: 592 p. ; 18 cm.Type of document: BookBibliography/Index: Includes index
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Book Europe Campus
Main Collection
Print J10.43 .I6 N44 1960
(Browse shelf)
001174477
Available 001174477
Total holds: 0

Includes index

Digitized

The Discovery of India Contents CHAPTER I. AHMADNAGAR FORT I. Twenty Months . . . II. Famine . . . III. The War for Democracy . . IV. Time in Prison: The Urge to Action . V. The Past in its Relation to the Present . VI. Life's Philosophy . . . VII. The Burden of the Past . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 1 2 4 6 8 . 10 20 . . CHAPTER II. BADENWEILER, LAUSANNE I. Kamala . . . II. Our Marriage and After . . . III. The Problem of Human Relationships . 5935. IV. Christmas, V. Death . VI. Mussolini. Return . . . . . . . . . 25 26 29 35 32 33 - CHAPTER III. THE QUEST I. The Panorama of India's Past II. Nationalism and Internationalism. III. India's Strength and Weakness IV. The Search for India . V. Bharat Mata . VI. The Variety and Unity of India . VII. Travelling through India VIII. General Elections IX. The Culture of the Masses . . X. Two Lives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 39 41 44 47 48 50 52 55 56 . . . . . . . . . . CHAPTER IV. THE DISCOVERY OF INDIA I. The Indus Valley Civilization . . . II. The Coming of the Aryans III. What is Hinduism? . . IV. The Earliest Records. Scripture and Mythology . . . V. The Vedas VI. The Acceptance and the Negation of Life . . VII. Synthesis and Adjustment. The Beginnings of the Caste System VIII. The Continuity of Indian Culture . . IX. The Upanishads. X. The Advantages and Disadvantages of an Individualistic Philosophy. XI. Materialism . . . . XII. The Epics. History, Tradition, and Myth . . . . 57 6o 62 65 67 69 73 76 78 82 85 88 . . . . . . . . . . Page XIII. The Mahabharata . . . . . XIV. The Bhagavad Gita . . . . . . . XV. Life and Work in Ancient India . . . . . . XVI. Mahavira and Buddha. Caste . . . . XVII. Chandragupta and Chanakya. The Maurya Empire Established XVIII. The Organization of the State . . . XIX. Buddha's Teaching . . . . . . . . XX. The Buddha Story . . . . . . . . XXI. Ashoka . . . . . . . . CHAPTER V. THROUGH THE AGES I. Nationalism and Imperialism under the Guptas II. South India . . . · . . III. Peaceful Development and Methods of Warfare . IV. India's Urge to Freedom . . . . . V. Progress versus Security . . . . VI. India and Iran . . . . . . VII. India and Greece . . . . . VIII. The Old Indian Theatre . . . . IX. The Vitality and Persistence of Sanskrit . X. Buddhist Philosophy XI. Effect of Buddhism on Hinduism. . . . XII. How did Hinduism Absorb Buddhism in India? . XIII. The Indian Philosophical Approach . . . XIV. The Six Systems of Philosophy . . . . XV. India and China . . . . . XVI. Indian Colonies and Culture in South-East Asia XVII. The Influence of Indian Art Abroad . . . XVIII. Old Indian Art . . . . . . . XIX. India's Foreign Trade XX. Mathematics in Ancient India . . . . XXI. Growth and Decay . . . . . . CHAPTER VI. NEW PROBLEMS . . . . . . . 95 97 99 . 108 · 113 . 117 . 119 . 121 . 125 . 128 . 129 . 130 . 132 · 135 . 139 . 146 · 154 160 . 165 . 169 . 171 · 174 · 184 . 192 . 199 . 203 208 . 210 . 215 . 221 . 226 . 229 · 232 . 236 . 241 244 . 246 . 253 256 . 261 267 270 . 273 . 279 . 282 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I. The Arabs and the Mongols . . . . . . . II. The Flowering of Arab Culture and Contacts with India III. Mahmud of Ghazni and the Afghans . . . . . . IV. The Indo-Afghans. South India. Vijayanagar. Babar. Sea-power . V. Synthesis and Growth of Mixed Culture. Purdah. Kabir. Guru Nanak Amir Khusrau . . . . . . . . . VI. The Indian Social Structure. Importance of the Group . . . VII. Village Self-Government. The Shukru Nitisara . . VIII. The Theory and Practice of Caste. The Joint Family . . . IX. Babar and Akbar. The Process of Indianization . . . . X. The Contrast between Asia and Europe in Mechanical Advance and Creative Energy XI. Development of a Common Culture . . . . . . XII. Aurungzeb Puts the Clock Back. Growth of Hindu Nationalism. Shivaji . XIII. The Marathas and the British Struggle for Supremacy. Triumph of the British XIV. The Backwardness of India and the Superiority of the English in Organization and Technique. . . . . . XV. Ranjit Singh and Jai Singh . . . . . . . . XVI. The Economic Background of India. The Two Englands . . CHAPTER VII. THE LAST PHASE--(I) CONSOLIDATION OF BRITISH RULE AND RISE OF NATIONALIST MOVEMENT I. The Ideology of Empire. The New Caste . . . . . II. The Plunder of Bengal Helps the Industrial Revolution in England . III. The Destruction of India's Industry and the Decay of her Agriculture IV. India Becomes for the First Time a Political and Economic Appendage of Another Country . . . . . . . V. The Growth of the Indian States System . . . . . VI. Contradictions of British Rule in India. Ram Mohan Roy. The Press. Sir William Jones. English Education in Bengal . . . VII. The Great Revolt of 1857. Racialism . . VIII. The Techniques of British Rule. Balance and Counterpoise . IX. Growth of Industry. Provincial Differences . . . . X. Reform and Other Movements among Hindus and Moslems . XI. Kemal Pasha. Nationalism in Asia. Iqbal . . . . . XII. Heavy Industry Begins. Tilak and Gokhale. Separate Electorates . CHAPTER VIII. THE LAST PHASE--(2) NATIONALISM VERSUS IMPERIALISM I. Helplessness of the Middle Classes. Gandhi Comes II. The Congress becomes a Dynamic Organization under Gandhi's Leadership III. Congress Governments in the Provinces . . . . . IV. Indian Dynamism versus British Conservatism in India . . V. The Question of Minorities. The Moslem League. Mr. M. A. Jinnah VI. The National Planning Committee . . VII. The Congress and Industry. Big Business versus Cottage Industry . VIII. Government Checks Industrial Growth. War Production is Diversion from Normal Production . . . . . . . . CHAPTER IX. THE LAST PHASE-0) WORLD WAR II I. The Congress Develops a Foreign Policy . . . . . II. The Congress Approach to War . . . . . . III. Reaction to War . . . . IV. Another Congress Offer and its Rejection by the British Government. Mr. Winston Churchill . . . . . . . V. Individual Civil Disobedience . . . . . . . VI. After Pearl Harbour. Gandhi and Non-violence VII. Tension . . . . . VIII. Sir Stafford Cripps conies to India . . . . . . IX. Frustration . . . X. The Challenge: Quit India Resolution . . . CHAPTER X. AHMADNAGAR FORT AGAIN I. The Chain of Happening . . . II. The Two Backgrounds: Indian and British . III. Mass Upheavals and their Suppression . IV. Reactions Abroad . . . V. Reactions in India VI. India's Sickness. Famine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 490 · 491 . 495 . 503 . 505 . 507 . 423 . 429 434 . 440 . 448 . 451 . 45 8 . 463 474 479 359 363 . 369 . 375 . 385 400 . 407 . 416 Page . 287 294 . 297 . 301 . 306 . 312 . 323 . 328 . 332 . 337 . 352 . 355 Page VII. India's Dynamic Capacity . . . . 512 VIII. India's Growth Arrested . . . . . . 558 IX. Religion, Philosophy, and Science . . . . . . 522 X. The Importance of the National Idea. Changes Necessary in India . . 528 XI. India: Partition or Strong National State or Centre of Super-National State? 537 XII. Realism and Geopolitics. World Conquest or World Association. The U.S.A. and the U.S.S.R. . · . . . . . 550 XIII. Freedom and Empire . . . 562 XIV. The Problem of Population. Falling Birth-rates and National Decay . 566 XV. The Modern Approach to an Old Problem . . · . . 572 XVI. Epilogue . . . 577 Postcript . . . . . . . . 583 xiv

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