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EEC integration towards 1992: some distributional aspects

Author: Neven, Damien J. INSEAD Area: Economics and Political Science Series: Working Paper ; 90/23/EPS/SM Publisher: Fontainebleau : INSEAD, 1990.Language: EnglishDescription: 72 p.Type of document: INSEAD Working Paper Online Access: Click here Abstract: This paper evaluates how the benefits and costs of the internal marketprogramme will be sharedacrosss the European countries. The main conclusion that emerges is that the Northern European countries willhave little to expect from the internal market, except the UK (because it is less integrated), while the Southern European ones will benefit most by it. The accrual of benefits through a better exploitation of comparative advantages within Europe is examined and it is noticed that specialisation of production occurs more between the North and the South of Europe than among the Northern European countries. An attempt to quantify the overall benefits accruing from the better exploitation of the comparative advantage between the North and the South is made. Again, the effect is shown to be potentially much stronger in the South..
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This paper evaluates how the benefits and costs of the internal marketprogramme will be sharedacrosss the European countries. The main conclusion that emerges is that the Northern European countries willhave little to expect from the internal market, except the UK (because it is less integrated), while the Southern European ones will benefit most by it. The accrual of benefits through a better exploitation of comparative advantages within Europe is examined and it is noticed that specialisation of production occurs more between the North and the South of Europe than among the Northern European countries. An attempt to quantify the overall benefits accruing from the better exploitation of the comparative advantage between the North and the South is made. Again, the effect is shown to be potentially much stronger in the South..

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