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Organizational neurosis

Author: Kets de Vries, Manfred F. R. INSEAD Area: Entrepreneurship and Family Enterprise In: Blackwell encyclopedic dictionary of organizational behavior - Nicholson, Nigel;Schuler, Randall S.;Van - 1995 - Book Language: EnglishDescription: p. 396-399.Type of document: INSEAD ChapterNote: Please ask the Library for this chapterAbstract: Organizational research has traditionally focused on telling executives how to do things correctly by creating models for rational analysis. However, the reality of the situation often requires a radically different approach. Organizations are not immune to neurotic behavior patterns, disturbing interpersonal interactions, and rigid defensive mechanisms. An organization cannot perform successfully if the quirks and irrational processes that are part and parcel of individual behavior are ignored. Many observers and practitioners of organizational life have come to understand that the "irrational" personality traits of the principal decision makers can seriously affect the management process.There is substantive body of evidence to support the contention that organizational leaders are not necessarily rational, logical, sensible, and dependable human beings, but, in fact, are prone to a fair amount of irrational behavior.
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Organizational research has traditionally focused on telling executives how to do things correctly by creating models for rational analysis. However, the reality of the situation often requires a radically different approach. Organizations are not immune to neurotic behavior patterns, disturbing interpersonal interactions, and rigid defensive mechanisms. An organization cannot perform successfully if the quirks and irrational processes that are part and parcel of individual behavior are ignored. Many observers and practitioners of organizational life have come to understand that the "irrational" personality traits of the principal decision makers can seriously affect the management process.There is substantive body of evidence to support the contention that organizational leaders are not necessarily rational, logical, sensible, and dependable human beings, but, in fact, are prone to a fair amount of irrational behavior.

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