Normal view MARC view

Dysfunctional decision making and organizational pathology

Author: Kets de Vries, Manfred F. R. INSEAD Area: Entrepreneurship and Family EnterpriseIn: Strategic management by Christian Scholtz and Joachim Zentes; Poeschel, 1994 Language: EnglishDescription: p. 1-16.Type of document: INSEAD ChapterNote: Please ask the Library for this chapter.Abstract: The year 1993 will remain a memorable one for Jacques Attali, who had been then the "wunderkind" of the French political establishment. Not only did Nobel prize Eli Wiesel accuse him of plagiarism ..., it was also the year in which he was forced to resign from his post of president of the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development. His imperious and secretive behavior stimulated political infighting among his subordinates, created a corporate culture of fear and paranoia, and led to faulty decision making. The bank's board of governors ... eventually forced Attali to resign. What went wrong in the case of Attali? To what extend was he reponsible for the organizational pathology that led to faulty decision making? Is Attali an isolated case, or is this pattern of behavior regularly found among other executives? What can be said about the peculiar nature of the leader-organization interface in these situations? Are there certain forms of pressure to which leaders are particularly susceptible?
Tags: No tags from this library for this title. Add tag(s)
Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due
INSEAD Chapter Digital Library
PDF Available

Please ask the Library for this chapter.

The year 1993 will remain a memorable one for Jacques Attali, who had been then the "wunderkind" of the French political establishment. Not only did Nobel prize Eli Wiesel accuse him of plagiarism ..., it was also the year in which he was forced to resign from his post of president of the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development. His imperious and secretive behavior stimulated political infighting among his subordinates, created a corporate culture of fear and paranoia, and led to faulty decision making. The bank's board of governors ... eventually forced Attali to resign. What went wrong in the case of Attali? To what extend was he reponsible for the organizational pathology that led to faulty decision making? Is Attali an isolated case, or is this pattern of behavior regularly found among other executives? What can be said about the peculiar nature of the leader-organization interface in these situations? Are there certain forms of pressure to which leaders are particularly susceptible?

Digitized

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.
Koha 3.18 - INSEAD Library Catalogue
Library Home | Contact Us | What's Koha?