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Managing the global company

Author: Evans, Paul A. L. INSEAD Area: Organisational Behaviour In: Financial Times handbook of management - Crainer, Stuart - 1995 - Book Language: EnglishDescription: p. 920-929.Type of document: INSEAD ChapterNote: Please ask the Library for this chapter.Abstract: The process of internationalisation has accelerated throughout the twentieth century, in the mid 1990s, it has reached breakneck speed/The process of internationalization has accelerated throughout the 20th century, now in the mid 1990s it has reached breakneck speed. European firms in Britain, Holland and Germany, such as Unilever and Philips, were the first multinational coporations, investing capital outside their limited home markets late last century. Most US firms focused on the immense national market with limited export operations until the opportunity to transfer their expertise pulled them abroad in the 1960s. Japanese firms became multinational in this sense of direct foreign investment only in the 1980s. Internationalization has accelerated during the last thirty years with increasing free trade; the decline of national barriers (symbolised by the 1992 European open market and NAFTA); the emergence of newly industrialized countries bringing new market opportunities and competition; and the liberalization of regulated sectors. During the last ten years, the talk has increasingly been globalization
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The process of internationalisation has accelerated throughout the twentieth century, in the mid 1990s, it has reached breakneck speed/The process of internationalization has accelerated throughout the 20th century, now in the mid 1990s it has reached breakneck speed. European firms in Britain, Holland and Germany, such as Unilever and Philips, were the first multinational coporations, investing capital outside their limited home markets late last century. Most US firms focused on the immense national market with limited export operations until the opportunity to transfer their expertise pulled them abroad in the 1960s. Japanese firms became multinational in this sense of direct foreign investment only in the 1980s. Internationalization has accelerated during the last thirty years with increasing free trade; the decline of national barriers (symbolised by the 1992 European open market and NAFTA); the emergence of newly industrialized countries bringing new market opportunities and competition; and the liberalization of regulated sectors. During the last ten years, the talk has increasingly been globalization

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