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The Green fee: internalizing and operationalizing environmental issues

Author: Corbett, Charles J. ; Van Wassenhove, Luk N.INSEAD Area: Technology and Operations Management ; StrategyIn: California Management Review, vol. 36, no. 1, fall 1993 Language: EnglishDescription: p. 116-135.Type of document: INSEAD ArticleNote: Please ask the Library for this articleAbstract: Two of the major challenges facing business in its dealings with respect to environmental issues are internalization and operationalization. Appropriate internalization is needed to ensure that the company's reponses to environmental issues are consistent with its responses to other issues and whith its long-term goals. To each environmental issue, different levels of responses are possible ; in this paper we suggest a framework which, without providing any ready answers, may aid managers in structuring these responses. However, internalization only refers to intentions, and, as such, is not sufficient. To be effective, environmental intentions need to be operationalized, to become integrated into a firm's daily operations. Again without providing any specific guidelines, we suggest that operationalization of environmental programs can be facilitated by exploring and exploiting analogies with existing and proven programs already in place in many firms
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Two of the major challenges facing business in its dealings with respect to environmental issues are internalization and operationalization. Appropriate internalization is needed to ensure that the company's reponses to environmental issues are consistent with its responses to other issues and whith its long-term goals. To each environmental issue, different levels of responses are possible ; in this paper we suggest a framework which, without providing any ready answers, may aid managers in structuring these responses. However, internalization only refers to intentions, and, as such, is not sufficient. To be effective, environmental intentions need to be operationalized, to become integrated into a firm's daily operations. Again without providing any specific guidelines, we suggest that operationalization of environmental programs can be facilitated by exploring and exploiting analogies with existing and proven programs already in place in many firms

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