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Managing organizational transitions

Author: Kimberly, John R. ; Quinn, Robert E. Series: Irwin series in management and the behavioral sciences Publisher: Irwin, 1984.Language: EnglishDescription: x, 322 p. ; 23 cm.ISBN: 0256031363 (pbkOther Title: New futures Type of document: BookNote: Classroom ed. of New futures : the challenge of managing corporate transitions/Includes bibliographies and index
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due
Book Doriot Library
Main Collection
Print HD6954 .K56 1984
(Browse shelf)
000053367
Available
Book Doriot Library
Main Collection
Print HD6954 .K56 1984
(Browse shelf)
001085202
Available

Classroom ed. of New futures : the challenge of managing corporate transitions/Includes bibliographies and index

Digitized

Managing Organization Transitions Contents 1 The challenge of transition management, John R. Kimberly and Robert E. Quinn 1 Why now? Managing transitions. The plan. The menu. PART I Restructuring 2 Formalization as crisis: Transition planning for a young organization, Robert E. Quinn and David F. Andersen 11 Formalization: The first major transition. Formalization planning: The focal system. Strategic choice. Analysis of performance. Longitudinal impact analysis. Summary and discussion. 3 The transition that hasn't happened, J. Richard Hackman 29 The firm. The role of the researcher, The notion of an organizational transition. Growth and transition at People Express: The growth of the firm. Searching for signs of transitions. Did transitions occur at People Express? Conclusions: Organizational performance. Understanding the People Express experience. vii viii Contents 4 Strategies for organizational transitioning, Craig C. Lundberg 60 Toward the clarification of strategic organizational transitioning. Toward a model of organizational transitions. On transition strategies. The facilitation of transformational transitioning. Summary and prospects. PART II Repositioning 5 Managing in crisis: Nine principles for successful transition, David L. Warren 85 The management of transition. Introduction. Origins of crisis. Transition. Managing the transition. Principles of practice. The structural principles. The process principles. The symbolic principles. Summary. Conclusion. 6 When cultures collide: Issues in acquisition, Amy L. Sales and Philip H. Mirvis 107 Background on the DC organization. The acquisition: The research. Transition: Cross-cultural relations: Understanding culture. 1979: DC culture one year after the acquisition. Implications of the first-year data: Polarization. Evaluation. Ethnocentrism. Between 1979 and 1981: Shift to a market-oriented structure. Executive vice president selection. 1981: DC culture three years after the acquisition: Philosophy. Values. Interpersonal behaviors. Business-related behaviors. Interpretation of the third-year data: Changes in perception and attitude. A model of acculturation: Levels of acculturation at DC. Managing acculturation: Ql: Power and choice in the firm of acculturation. Q2: The nature of relations between cultures. Q3: The retention of cultural identity. Final thoughts. 7 New program development: Issues in managing vertical integration, Stephen M. Shortell and Thomas M. Wickixer 134 Introduction. Major evaluation questions. Conceptual framework. Study design and data sources: The extensive study. The intensive study. Linking the extensive and intensive studies. Findings: Overall results. Managing technical, political, and cultural issues. Guidelines for managing organizational transitions in health care: Centrality to organizational mission and strategic plan. Recognizing and managing differences in culture. Recognizing and managing environmental variables. Assessing the degree of coupling required. Recognizing that organization design and management practices are themselves sources of uncertainty, complexity, and problem formation. Using multiple strategies to manage cultural, technical, and political issues. Contents i x 8 A delete design model for successful transitions, Stuart Albert 169 A delete design model for successful transitions. Origins. The delete design model: I. The process of summarization. II. The process of justification. III. The continuity process. IV. The AC process: An increase in thestrength of the bond to objects of future loss. The delete design model and the doctrine of emergent properties. Two manifestations of the delete design model: Organizational funerals. Serious play: The delete design simulation. Resistance to change: Which is more unknown, the past or the future? Summary and conclusions. PART III Revitalizing 9 Managing transitions in organizational culture: The case of participative management at Honeywell, Rosabeth Moss Kanter 195 Background. The problem. History of "IT" at DSD. The formation of the "IT" steering committee. Results one year later. Conclusions: The need to manage participation: Abdication of managerial responsibility in connection with the participation. Development of disjointed, uncoordinated, and possibly contradictory programs. Emergence of a `quick fix" mentality. Insufficient development of vehicles to institutionalize the programs. Assumption that "participation" is an end in itself, rather than a path to other goals. Extensions. 10 Transitioning to change: Lessons from NSC, A. Lee Barrett, Jr. and 218 Cortlandt Cammann Introduction: The problem: Creating a climate for change. The context: The steel industry and NSC. The first steps. Determining a common organizational direction. Beginning to implement the mission. The transition structures in operation. Emerging organizational issues. Results of the change process. Characteristics of a transition from stability to change. Conclusion. Appendix: Mission statement National Steel Corporation. 11 Revitalizing organizations: The leadership role, Noel Tichy and David Ulrich 240 Introduction. Rationale for revitalization: Internal resistance to change. The nature of transformations: Organizational dynamics. Individual dynamics. Leadership which can revitalize: General characteristics of transformational leaders. Transformation leadership role and skills. Conclusion. PART IV Reviewing 12 Rabbits, lynxes, and organizational transitions, Kenwyn K. Smith 267 Introduction: Three tales. Cybernetics I. The shift. Cybernetics II: Stability versus resilience. Autopoiesis. Morphogenesis. Symbiosis, communication, and fusion. Alternative ways of thinking. 13 Paradox, planning, and perseverance: Guidelines for managerial 295 practice, Robert E. Quinn and John R. Kimberly Introduction: Culture and management. The concept of transition. Eight guidelines for managing transitions: Strategic readjustment. Political adaptation. Cultural redevelopment. Structural routinization. Summary and conclusion. Index 315

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