Normal view MARC view

Trading places: how we allowed Japan to take the lead

Author: Prestowitz, Clyde Publisher: Basic Books, 1988.Language: EnglishDescription: 365 p. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0465086802Type of document: BookBibliography/Index: Includes bibliographical references and index
Tags: No tags from this library for this title. Add tag(s)
Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due
Book Abu Dhabi Library
Main Collection
Print HF1359.42 .J3 P74 1988
(Browse shelf)
500025212
Available
Book Tanoto Library
Main Collection
Print HF1359.42 .J3 P74 1988
(Browse shelf)
900110507
Available
Book Tanoto Library
Main Collection
Print HF1359.42 .J3 P74 1988
(Browse shelf)
900157847
Available

Includes bibliographical references and index

Digitized

C O N T E N T S LIST OF FIGURES PREFACE PART I The Sleeping Giant 1 THE END OF THE AMERICAN CENTURY The Opening of Japan Cracks in the Hegemony of the United States The High-Tech Crisis Crisis in Wall Street The Crisis Intensifies The Real Challenge to American Power 2 LOSING THE CHIPS: THE SEMICONDUCTOR INDUSTRY Early Days of the Semiconductor Industry The Invention of the Transistor The Industry in the United States The Industry in Japan The Competition between the United States and Japan The Japanese Take on IBM The Race for the 64K RAM The Story behind the Statistics Victory Realized Negotiations between the United States and Japan The Dumping Problem Early Agreements The Bottom Falls Out The Legal War The Agreement of 1986 The United States Imposes Sanctions 26 Contents PART II What Makes Japan Run 3 PERCEPTION GAP: "UNFAIR" TRADE AND "OPEN" MARKETS The Problem of "Unfair" Trade The Japanese Sense of Difference The Importance of the Group The Concern with Harmony The Concern with Conformity Group Ethics and Watching The Importance of Personal Relationships The Concept of Hierarchy The Sense of Exclusiveness The Hierarchy of Geography The Drive for Self-Sufficiency A Closed Market 4 THE MANDARINS: JAPAN'S POWERFUL MINISTRIES Early Industrialization The Rise of the Ministries The Japanese Bureaucracy The Making of a Bureaucrat Bureaucratic Power Procedures as Power 5 MANDARIN STRATEGIES: JAPAN'S INDUSTRIAL POLICY The Purpose of Industrial Policy The Theory of Industrial Policy The Tools of Industrial Policy The Visions of Industrial Policy The Promotion of New Industries Military Coproduction Restructuring Mature Industries: Cartels Other Tools: Press, Ministries. Government Officials How Japan Explains its Policies 6 KAISHA: DOING BUSINESS IN JAPAN A Japanese Company Employment Policies: Business or Church The Power of the Group Economic Groups (keiretsu) Enterprise Groups (kigyo keiretsu) Growth and Finance Policies Strategic Concerns: Manufacturing, Quality, Technology Public Support The Government The Press 73 100 122 151 Contents Relationships with Foreign Businesses Weaknesses of Japanese Business Practices PART III What Makes America Wind Down 7 EVERY MAN FOR HIMSELF: DOING BUSINESS IN THE UNITED STATES A U.S. Company: Motorola Early Years (1928-57) Trading with Japan: First Experience Japan's Conquest of Television Problems of U.S. Business The Flight of U.S. Technology Short-Term Profit versus Long-Term Growth l The Decline of Quality and Productivity The Isolation of U.S. Business 8 TRADERS OR WARRIORS: THE CONFLICT BETWEEN ECONOMIC AND NATIONAL SECURITY The Loss of a Critical Industry The Machine Tool Industry in the United States and Japan The Houdaille Decision The Force of Economic Theory Conversations with Economists U.S. Trade Laws and Their Unrealistic Assumptions Economic versus National Security Revisiting the Machine Tool Issue The Burden of Military Spending 9 U.S. TRADE NEGOTIATIONS: THE PLAYERS The U.S. Congress The Strauss-Ushiba Agreement (1978) The Auto Agreement (1981) The Management of Trade in the United States The Office of Trade Representative Civil Servants: The Makers of Trade Policy Press and Public Relations Lobbying and Lobbyists Boundaries of Negotiation Congress U.S. Trade Representative Commerce Department State Department U.S. Embassy, Tokyo National Security Council Staff Defense Department 187 217 250 Contents Treasury Department Council of Economic Advisers Agriculture Department Central Intelligence Agency 10 U.S. TRADE NEGOTIATIONS: AN INSIDER'S REPORT Setting the Agenda in Washington (1981) Talks in Tokyo (1981) Devising a U.S. Strategy (1982) Gaining Leverage in Tokyo (1982) The Issue of Barriers The "Fish and Chips" Policy (1982) Trade Negotiations and the Summit Conference (summer 1982) The Ron-Yasu Relationship (1982-83) U.S. Task Force (1983-84) A New Strategy: Market-Oriented/Sector-Specific (1984-85) The Same Old Story (1987) PART IV A Look toward the Future 11 WAKING UP The Situation Today A Colony-in-the-Making: The United States The Double-Edged Sword of Success: Japan The Dilemma A Prescription for the Future: The United States Setting New Priorities Trade Policy and Negotiations Learning to Compete with Japan Strengthening Business A Prescription for the Future: Japan Land Reform Helping the Consumer Trade and Investment Sharing in the Free World Conclusion: Hanging Together NOTES BIBLIOGRAPHY INDEX 305 272 335 346 355 L I S T O F F I G U R E S 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 2.7 2.8 6.1 Cumulative Change in World Semiconductor Market Share Since 1978 Semiconductor Manufacturing Equipment World Market Share Examples of Experience Curves Share Momentum Graph The Margin Paradox Memory Products: World Market Share United States and Japan Market Size U.S. Share of Japanese Semiconductor Market The Sumitomo Group 27 28 41 42 42 45 55 63 158

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.
Koha 3.18 - INSEAD Library Catalogue
Library Home | Contact Us | What's Koha?