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Physiology and consumer behavior across cultures

Author: Parker, Philip M. ; Tavassoli, N. T.INSEAD Area: Marketing Series: Working Paper ; 98/59/MKT Publisher: Fontainebleau : INSEAD, 1998.Language: EnglishDescription: 36 p.Type of document: INSEAD Working Paper Online Access: Click here Abstract: This paper suggests how human physiology offers foundations from which causal attributions in cross-cultural research can be made. We propose a global model which examines how universal physiological mechanisms give rise to variance in cross-cultural behaviors as consumers face different environmental conditions. We summarize how physiology-based explanations can expand our understanding of consumer behaviors such as homeothermic and hedonic consumption, consumption dynamics such as variety seeking, felt and expressed affect, and the sensitivity towards affective stimuli. We also map out how these consumer behaviors may themselves be instrumental in shaping higher-order behaviors such as desires to generate income and cultural values such as materialism. We conclude by discussing why we expect that these types of consumer behaviors will not converge across cultures facing different physical environments Next title: Physiology and consumer behavior across cultures (RV of 98/59/MKT) - Parker, Philip M.;Tavassoli, N. T. - 1998 - INSEAD Working Paper
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This paper suggests how human physiology offers foundations from which causal attributions in cross-cultural research can be made. We propose a global model which examines how universal physiological mechanisms give rise to variance in cross-cultural behaviors as consumers face different environmental conditions. We summarize how physiology-based explanations can expand our understanding of consumer behaviors such as homeothermic and hedonic consumption, consumption dynamics such as variety seeking, felt and expressed affect, and the sensitivity towards affective stimuli. We also map out how these consumer behaviors may themselves be instrumental in shaping higher-order behaviors such as desires to generate income and cultural values such as materialism. We conclude by discussing why we expect that these types of consumer behaviors will not converge across cultures facing different physical environments

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