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Eco-restructuring: the transition to an ecologically sustainable economy (RV of 95/72/EPS)

Author: Ayres, Robert U. INSEAD Area: Economics and Political Science Series: Working Paper ; 95/83/EPS (Revised Version of 95/72/EPS) Publisher: Fontainebleau : INSEAD Centre for the Management of Environmental and Social Responsibility (CMER) 1995.Language: EnglishDescription: 34 p.Type of document: INSEAD Working Paper Online Access: Click here Abstract: The term "sustainability" has been popularized in recent years, and there is some danger of it becoming a cliché. The chapter seeks to sort out the questions about sustainability on which there is substantial scientific agreement from those unresolved questions that are still subject to considerable controversy. In this context, several theses are proposed. The first thesis is that there are limits to the capacity of the natural environment to accomodate anthropogenic disturbances. The earth is finite. Second, there are also limits to the sustainability of conventional market goods and services for environmental services. Third, there are limits to the extent to which technology can repair or replace environmental resources that are irreversibly damaged. For instance, one cannot imagine undertaking to substitute engineering systems designed by humans to replace natural means of climate control and stabilization Previous title: Eco-restructuring: the transition to an ecologically sustainable economy - Ayres, Robert U.;Schmidt-Bleek, F. B. - 1995 - INSEAD Working Paper
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The term "sustainability" has been popularized in recent years, and there is some danger of it becoming a cliché. The chapter seeks to sort out the questions about sustainability on which there is substantial scientific agreement from those unresolved questions that are still subject to considerable controversy. In this context, several theses are proposed. The first thesis is that there are limits to the capacity of the natural environment to accomodate anthropogenic disturbances. The earth is finite. Second, there are also limits to the sustainability of conventional market goods and services for environmental services. Third, there are limits to the extent to which technology can repair or replace environmental resources that are irreversibly damaged. For instance, one cannot imagine undertaking to substitute engineering systems designed by humans to replace natural means of climate control and stabilization

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